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Customizable Linux tablet features 10.1-inch multitouch display

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Hardware

Japanese reseller Redstar has begun taking pre-orders for an ARM11-based 10.1-inch tablet computer from RealEase that runs the new Shogo Linux distro. The Shogo Tablet runs on a 533MHz Freescale i.MX37 system-on-chip (SoC) with 256MB RAM and 4GB flash, and offers a 1024 × 600 capacitive display, Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, plus 3G and Zigbee options, says RealEase.

RealEase briefly announced the Shogo Tablet and Shogo Linux operating system back in April, and began shipping the tablet earlier this month directly to OEMs for $500, with discounts for larger quantities. Now, Japan-based Redstar is taking pre-orders for the Shogo Tablet for 56,800 Yen (about $673).

rest here




re: Linux tablet

The link has a boo boo.

$500 for a small underpowered tablet that's not even shipping yet.

Somehow I doubt Apple is losing sleep over it (unless it's from laughing so hard).

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