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8 Questions with John Carmack

Filed under
Interviews
Gaming

John Carmack needs no introduction - since 1991 he's been the main engine development guy for id Software. Shortly after his 40th birthday, we caught up with the tru engineer for a quick 8-question Q&A.

> Do you have a target performance level or specific platform in mind when you begin planning your engines?

For this generation, we picked the 360 / PS3 as the target platform, knowing that the PC platform would be well past that performance level when we were done. I am thinking about the next generation now, which is rather difficult because we don’t know much about what is being considered for future consoles. I may just try to see what I can do with a state of the art PC platform in research mode.

> What’s been the most challenging aspect of building the id Tech 5 engine?

The enormous virtual textures have been challenging for both the workflow and runtime code, but that was the core bet that we made for the project.

rest here




Also: Duke Nukem Forever May Show Up at PAX today

re: Duke Nukem

Fool me once - shame on you.
Fool me twice - shame on me.

I'll wait until there's a real playable demo to download before I start believing it "might" be true.

re: Duke

I hear ya. This is about third or fourth time it was said to be resurrected ain't it? Big Grin

re: Duke

Are we sure it's not going to be some type of Zombie game? Nobody comes back from the dead this much.

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