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Virtualization

Filed under
Linux

In my last post, i introduced some of us to the world of Linux, the advantages it offers and the status it confers.

Understandably, it is still a Microsoft world, so i wouldn’t expect you to just clean out your Windows operating system and install Linux. If you do that, trust me, you will definitely have issues, truck loads.

I can think of two paths to follow if you’ll like to have a feel of Linux; DUAL/MULTIPLE BOOTING or VIRTUALIZATION.

DUAL/MULTIPLE BOOTING requires creating partitions on your laptops, the Linux OS would be installed in these partitions. This can be very tricky and the outcome may be very unpredictable and may require some knowledge of rocket science, if you know what i mean. Some of the stress could be reduced with the use of partition boot softwares like Partition Boot Manager .The software is not free, and still requires some level of skills and i am not sure the product is still being supported.

The concept of VIRTUALIZATION is the bane of this write-up and a preferred alternative especially in this scenario of “Water Testing”. Virtualization is enjoying increasing popularity and has varied application but we will restrict ourselves to our immediate purpose.

Further Reading
http://www.artwales.biz/?p=12

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