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Linux desktop market share: Small no matter how you measure

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Linux

It doesn't give me any pleasure in saying this, but the evidence is overwhelming that Linux is not huge on the desktop. Saying it has maybe 1% of the desktop marketshare is probably not realistic, but not as far off the mark as we'd like.

Measuring Linux market share is not an easy task, especially not on the desktop. Most Linux users don't buy Linux pre-loaded, they download Ubuntu, Fedora, Debian, openSUSE, or another distro from a series of mirrors, BitTorrents, or share CDs. No matter how you count up, though, the total number is pretty small compared to the number of desktops in use.

A lot of folks are bandying about a 1% figure, citing Web statistics and so on. Caitlyn Martin, over on O'Reilly Broadcast, says that the 1% figure is a myth, and goes on to argue that "Educated guesswork probably puts Linux at close to 10%, just about even with MacOS. That is a far cry from 1% and is in no way insignificant."

rest here




1%?

blog.init.hr: There have been many people claiming Linux didn’t pass 1% market share. That green over there is - Linux. Website is about - adventure sports.

see the graph here

Re: 1%?

My site shows Linux at 2.52% at the moment. Either way who cares, it rocks my computer, that's all I need to know.

I've seen a graffiti on a bus seat, it said "do the opposite of what anybody else are doing and 90% of the times you'll be doing the right thing". So true, especially with computer operating systems.

One little, two little, three

One little, two little, three little linux
four little, five little, six little linux
seven little, eight little, nine little linux

ten little linux installs! Big Grin

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