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Goodbye, OpenOffice. Nice Knowing You.

Filed under
OOo

I'm about to do something that will have more than a few people who know me thrashing around and screaming in horror. I'm replacing a free application with one I'm paying money for.

To be precise, I'm replacing what I use of OpenOffice.org 3.2 with Microsoft Office 2010.

Shock! Gasp!

Well, it wasn't like I didn't try.

I tried using OO's Writer as a replacement for Word, and ran into one inadequacy after another.

In its broad outlines, OO is not a bad program. It works decently well for quick-and-dirty word processing, and even some fairly advanced tasks.

The devil, as always, is in the details.




meh

Gawd, as if I really care what Word processor you use or why you use it. You are just not that important.

ever notice

when people announce something "works for me' they get stomped on and put down.

When you moan and whine about how you couldn't do something many others have accomplished though, it's just "telling it like it is" and being 'realistic"

some peoples children.

why?

Have you ever thought that saying "works for me" is just as unhelpful as saying "sucks to be you".

Works for me!

fewt wrote:
Have you ever thought that saying "works for me" is just as unhelpful as saying "sucks to be you".

I've always thought of it as sorry I am not able to duplicate your issue as it works as intended for me.

Works for me!

That's not how it's received. It is received as arrogant, and ignorant.

I would guess that 99% of the time it's stated by zealots who don't even spend 60 seconds trying to understand the users problem.

I think saying "sucks to be you" would probably be less arrogant to be honest.

Re: ever notice

bigbearomaha wrote:
when people announce something "works for me' they get stomped on and put down.

When you moan and whine about how you couldn't do something many others have accomplished though, it's just "telling it like it is" and being 'realistic"

some peoples children.

Spot on! The negative always makes people feel at home for some reason.

negative

sittingpenguin wrote:
The negative always makes people feel at home for some reason.

There no escaping entropy.

actually

fewt, it's probably more like some people just aren't happy unless they are miserable and trying to make as many others miserable as well.

I notice you have no trouble at all trying to generalize and brush people into vague groups just because it suits your need to feel victimized.

for most people, "works for me" is very much more likely as poodles stated. where one person states it doesn't work for them, another person is simply saying , " don't know what to tell ya, it does work here."

enjoy your pity party though fewt, it must be tough to be so alone in the world.

Big Bear

@BigBearOmaha

bigbearomaha wrote:
I notice you have no trouble at all trying to generalize and brush people into vague groups just because it suits your need to feel victimized.

Seriously? "victimized"? WOW, you went to a whole new level of stupid there. I don't even know how else to respond to that except to tell you that you are an idiot. Wink

I haven't generalized, look at any forum and see the frustration by users. It speaks for itself.

bigbearomaha wrote:

for most people, "works for me" is very much more likely as poodles stated.

Accuse me of generalizing, then proceed to generalize. Way to fail there.

bigbearomaha wrote:

where one person states it doesn't work for them, another person is simply saying , " don't know what to tell ya, it does work here."

ok, we'll pretend you are right for a second. Ok, we are done pretending. People all across the internets make fun of people that portray this level of idiocy.

For example: http://tmrepository.com/trademarks/worksforme/

You believe it the way that you want though, it matters not to me.

bigbearomaha wrote:

enjoy your pity party though fewt, it must be tough to be so alone in the world.

Again, seriously? I am "alone" in the world, eh? What in the world am I having a pity party over? That's really funny stuff right there. It's very interesting how you make all sorts of accusations about me for simply posting my opinion.

You don't know the first thing about me, but lets not let that stop you from the personal attacks tho.

wow guy, have you read your

wow guy, have you read your own posts? talk about personal attacks.

check the dictionary. generalizing is lumping a lot into one group. what I did to you wasn't generalizing, it was calling you out. look it up.

I tell you what. I will pretend you don't exist anymore because you aren't making any kind of sense here and I don't feel like wasting more time on this.

enjoy Linux.

Big Bear

wow, thanks!

bigbearomaha wrote:
wow guy, have you read your own posts? talk about personal attacks.

Aww you poor little guy, did I hurt your feelings?

Quote:

check the dictionary. generalizing is lumping a lot into one group. what I did to you wasn't generalizing, it was calling you out. look it up.

By "calling me out" all you have done is show your ignorance.

generalizing - present participle of gen·er·al·ize (Verb)
Make general or broad statements: "it is not easy to generalize about the poor".

"for most people, "works for me" is very much more likely as poodles stated." <-- Generalizing.

bigbearomaha wrote:

I tell you what. I will pretend you don't exist anymore because you aren't making any kind of sense here and I don't feel like wasting more time on this.

Of course now you'll claim that I don't make sense, but hey, whatever. Pretending that I don't exist is all kinds of win for me.

I'll just consider it mission accomplished.

bigbearomaha wrote:

enjoy Linux.

Oh, now that I have your permission I think I'll go get an RHCE or something. Oh wait; already have one, nevermind.. Maybe I'll go get a LINUX JOB! Oh wait, have that too.

You really are a n00b. Wink

Works for me

I hate to say it, but I just finished doing some bureaucracy spreadsheets for my business with openoffice and it worked just fine for me.

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