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New Open-Xchange “OXtender” Enables Replacement of Windows Server

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Samba OXtender Adds File and Print Services for Windows Workstations
To Leading Open Source Collaboration Platform

TARRYTOWN, NY, January 30, 2006 – Beginning in March, customers of Open-Xchange, Inc. will have full access to and seamless integration with Linux-based Logon, File and Print services for Microsoft Windows workstations through Open-Xchange Server 5 – giving customers the option to fully replace Microsoft Exchange as well as Microsoft Windows Server.

A new extension to Open-Xchange Server 5, called “Samba OXtender”, enables end users to access all the information they need for their daily work - on one machine with a single graphical user interface. Samba OXtender provides seamless integration to printers and access to all files through the Open-Xchange Server user interface.

Open-Xchange Server 5 is the leading messaging and collaborative solution based on open source technology. It provides key messaging functions like email, calendaring, contacts and task management, fully integrated with advanced groupware features such as document sharing, project tracking, user forums, and a knowledge base. Open-Xchange Server 5 works with ´rich clients´ such as Microsoft Outlook as well as most browsers and mobile devices.

Samba OXtender enables streamlined and efficient administration with complete end user functionality managed with one single front end. All mission critical data such as emails and files are stored in a single place saving the administrator complexity - backing up to a single server.

Joint Development with IDEALX
Samba OXtender was jointly developed with Open-Xchange’s French business partner IDEALX, a leading European provider of open source "off-the-shelf" solutions, specialized in infrastructure and security. For more than 5 years, IDEALX has developed and deployed a rich offering for large corporate and government customers -- ranging from Samba/LDAP migration solutions to the leading open source IDX-PKI software.

"With Samba OXtender, customers can leverage their Open-Xchange Server investments in the next generation workplace,” said Frank Hoberg, CEO, Open-Xchange. “In addition to Microsoft Exchange, now they can consider moving away from Microsoft Windows Server as well.”

"For years, open source was missing a real alternative to traditional proprietary solutions in the collaboration space, but the landscape changed with the release last March of Open-Xchange Server 5," said Olivier Guilbert, CEO, IDEALX. "Open-Xchange Server combined with Samba OXtender gives customers a real low cost, powerful alternative to traditional proprietary platforms."

Samba OXtender will be shown for the first time to a large audience at Linux Solutions at CNIT Paris-La-Défense, from January 30 to February 2, 2006. Open-Xchange Business Partner IDEALX will show Samba OXtender and Open-Xchange Server 5 at booth E20. French distributor Hermitage Solutions will host Open-Xchange Server 5 at booth E18, business partner LINAGORA presents Open-Xchange Server at booth A8.

Availability and Pricing
Samba OXtender will be available mid March through Open-Xchange Online Shop and the Open-Xchange Partner Network. Samba OXtender for one server and 25 named users will be EUR / $250. Additional named users will be EUR / $5 per year, per user.

About Open-Xchange Server
Open-Xchange Server is one of the most active and fastest growing open source projects to date. Launched in August 2004, Open-Xchange Server now ranks #8 out of 303 groupware projects on freshmeat.net website, #1 in document repositories, #4 in handhelds, and overall #229 out of 39,673 listed projects. The Open-Xchange community website, www.open-xchange.org, is visited by 130,000 unique visitors each month, the GPL version of Open-Xchange Server is downloaded more than 9,000 times each month.

Open-Xchange Server 5, the commercial product launched in April 2005, is engineered for ease of installation, migration, administration, integration and use. It interoperates with virtually all web browsers and important proprietary and open source rich clients. Open-Xchange Server supports the two leading Enterprise Linux distributions, Red Hat and SUSE. Innovative connectors, OXtenders, enhance customer flexibility by using open standard APIs to integrate existing IT infrastructures, or even extend capabilities to fax, VoIP, or CRM solutions.

About IDEALX
Based out of Paris, IDEALX is the leader in "off the shelf" open source security software in Europe. IDEALX main software offerings “Open Trust” ranges from open source infrastructure stack that facilitates migration to open source to security software such as IDX-PKI and Cryptonit the user friendly open source signature software. IDEALX references includes Total, Michelin, or the Ministry of Defense of Swizerland. IDEALX is member of Association Francophone pour le développement d'Open-Xchange (http://www.afox.fr/). For more information, please visit www.idealx.com

About Open-Xchange Inc.
Open-Xchange Inc. delivers reliable and scalable messaging and advanced collaboration solutions. Its flagship product, Open-Xchange Server, is the market-leading advanced collaboration server that combines best-of-breed open source software with commercial software add-ons and connectors. Open-Xchange Server is among the Top 250 most popular and most active open source projects in the world today. Open-Xchange Inc. is headquartered in Tarrytown, NY, with research & development and operations concentrated in Olpe and Nuremberg, Germany and a sales office in Cyprus. For more information, please visit www.open-xchange.com

Baker Communications Group
Bill Baker
T +1 860-350-9100
wbaker@bakercg.com

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