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Linpus Lite 1.4 review

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Linux

Linpus Lite is the distribution for netbooks and smartbooks developed and maintained by Linpus Technologies, Inc. of Taipei, Taiwan. The company’s flagship Linux distribution used to be Linpus Desktop until it decided to focus on the Lite and QuickOS line. Linpus Lite 1.4, announced on July 30, 2010, is the latest update, and also the first to come with a standalone installer. This article is the first review of the Linpus Lite edition to be published on this website.

During the second stage of the installation process, GNOME and Xfce are the desktop environments available for installation. A third desktop interface known as Simple Mode is available after installation. Simple Mode is similar to Jolicloud’s interface. After Simple Mode is installed, from the command line by running yum install simple-mode, you can switch between Simple Mode and desktop mode (GNOME or Xfce) by clicking on the DesktopSwitcher applet on the panel.

CompizFusion, a 3D compositing window manager does not work out of the box, but it can be enabled using the Desktop Effects utility from the System > Preferences > Desktop Effects. Note: Switching between desktop mode and Simple Mode will not work with 3D desktop effects enabled.

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