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20 Linux Apps That Make the Desktop Easier

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Software

For most of us, using our preferred desktop Linux distributions has become second nature. Yet remembering back to when I first made the switch, it seems that specific Linux apps made the OS change much easier.

In this article, I want to share some of the applications I use on a daily basis. Some of the applications are GNOME desktop specific, so whenever possible I have included their KDE counterparts to help even things out.

1. GNOME System Monitor or KDE System Guard – This is something that I know many users never bother with. If they want to see what is going on with their Linux box, they rely on "top" or other command line-based resource tools.

Speaking for myself, I would rather save the need for a terminal and simply keep GNOME's System Monitor applet running at the top of my screen. The advantage is that if I need it, the applet opens the Monitor application straight away. For KDE users, I'd look to KDE System Guard for much of the same functionality.

2. Jungle Disk – Yes, I know it's not a FOSS application. Despite this, it has been the single most reliable backup tool I've ever used on any platform, bar none.

rest here




I agree with most of them.

I agree with most of them.

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