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WordPerfect for Linux lives on

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Software

Corel Corp. may have given up on bringing WordPerfect to Linux, but that doesn't mean Linux users have to give up on running WordPerfect on Linux.

A reader recently wrote me to say, "One of the things that keeps me dual-booting Linux and (sometimes) Windows is WordPerfect. I can't be weaned off it."

He's not the only one. Some law firms still swear by WordPerfect. And, once you have those function key shortcuts of WordPerfect embedded in your fingers, they can be hard to extract.

I understand perfectly. You see, my fingers, besides having vi embedded in them, still have the WordStar command set in them from its first days on CP/M computers.

Once you know -- I mean really know -- a word processor, it's hard to switch.

His question of the day was, "Do you know if WordPerfect 8 for Linux is still doable? Or should I just give it up? My fear is that it uses libraries so old, they would not be compatible. This assumes I could even find WordPerfect 8 for Linux in the first place."

He's in luck. WordPerfect 8 for Linux is still available, and with some work, you can still use it with a modern Linux distribution.

Full Story.

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