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Texas Mint Tea, anyone?

The Linux community is always hearing from naïve bloggers about the matter of “too many choices” in Linux. So, why not hear something naïve from a Linux user …

PCLinuxOS, originally based upon Mandrake/Mandriva and its RPM Package Manager, PC championed the notion of "use the best of the best" in its rolling release distro. PC has been active since late 2003.

LinuxMint championed "take the best and make it better." Starting with Ubuntu and tweaking it with their own additions and new tools. Mint uses the .deb package system, offering package management with its own Software Manager or Synaptic. Mint has been around since mid-2006.

Although LinuxMint's main version uses Gnome and PCLinuxOS's top offering uses KDE for the desktop, each distro offers its own varietal family using different desktop managers. Both offer fast, friendly forum communities. Both have always aimed to do, and use, everything “out of the box.” Because of this both are easy to use, especially for beginners, which attests to these distros attraction. Both dev teams seem to only push out a product when it is ready, not necessarily when everyone clamors for it … to be sure that it works as well as it should.

Now that Linux Mint is offering a new addition to its stable, a Debian-based, rolling release, it made me wonder … what if?

What if … a new Texas-Irish distro could rise from joining forces of the current number three and number six distro factories?
What if … the “minty” tools, and Mint's current higher “value” could be added to the PC 's expertise in using deb/rpm together in a rolling release?
What if … ?

What if … an attempt was made at just one more distro? Call it what you will; PCMint, MintOS or TexasMinty; but have it a collaboration, and find out what it would mean to work together, these two friendly, fantastic communities!

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