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Texas Mint Tea, anyone?

The Linux community is always hearing from naïve bloggers about the matter of “too many choices” in Linux. So, why not hear something naïve from a Linux user …

PCLinuxOS, originally based upon Mandrake/Mandriva and its RPM Package Manager, PC championed the notion of "use the best of the best" in its rolling release distro. PC has been active since late 2003.

LinuxMint championed "take the best and make it better." Starting with Ubuntu and tweaking it with their own additions and new tools. Mint uses the .deb package system, offering package management with its own Software Manager or Synaptic. Mint has been around since mid-2006.

Although LinuxMint's main version uses Gnome and PCLinuxOS's top offering uses KDE for the desktop, each distro offers its own varietal family using different desktop managers. Both offer fast, friendly forum communities. Both have always aimed to do, and use, everything “out of the box.” Because of this both are easy to use, especially for beginners, which attests to these distros attraction. Both dev teams seem to only push out a product when it is ready, not necessarily when everyone clamors for it … to be sure that it works as well as it should.

Now that Linux Mint is offering a new addition to its stable, a Debian-based, rolling release, it made me wonder … what if?

What if … a new Texas-Irish distro could rise from joining forces of the current number three and number six distro factories?
What if … the “minty” tools, and Mint's current higher “value” could be added to the PC 's expertise in using deb/rpm together in a rolling release?
What if … ?

What if … an attempt was made at just one more distro? Call it what you will; PCMint, MintOS or TexasMinty; but have it a collaboration, and find out what it would mean to work together, these two friendly, fantastic communities!

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Qt Creator 4.3 Beta released

Qt Quick Designer now integrates a QML code editor. This allows you to use views like the Properties editor and the Navigator also for text based editing. When you use the split view, you directly see the effects of what you are doing. The graphical editor got support for adding items and tab bar to stacked containers like StackedLayout and SwipeView, a tool bar with common actions, and support for HiDPI displays. Read more Also: Qt Creator 4.3 Beta Rolls Out QML Code Editor & CMake Server-Mode

today's leftovers

  • Red Hat - Another Quarter And A Totally New Set Of Investor Perceptions
  • BIG open-source love Microsoft and Google? You still won't catch AWS [Ed: Microsoft does not love FOSS (or loved by it); it actively attacks FOSS.]
    Open source wasn’t supposed to matter in the cloud. After the Free Software Foundation’s failed attempt to rein in network-delivered software services, some wrung their hands and waited for the open source apocalypse. Instead of imploding, however, open source adoption has exploded, with ever more permissive licenses rising to largely eliminate the need to contribute anything back.
  • Open Source Data:The Last Frontier of the Fintech Revolution
    In the early days of computing, programmers and software developers shared their creations learned from each other and therefore advanced computing and software engineering to new heights.
  • The cheap arm project: An affordable, open-source robotics project
    What do you get when you put together wood and rope? Well according to Plymouth University’s Professor Guido Bugmann: a low-cost, open source, 2 meter tall robot! All buildable for under £2000. The Cheap Arm Project (CHAP) began as an MSc project aimed at developing an affordable mobile robot arm system that could be used by wheelchair users to access daily objects at inaccessible heights or weights (the extreme case being 2 litre bottle).
  • European Interoperability Framework: Commission presents new guidance for digital public services
    The announcement will be made today, at the Digital Day in Rome, together with other initiatives that aim to promote cooperation between EU Member States to better prepare society to reap the full potential of the digital transformation. Many EU Member States are digitising their public administrations to save time, reduce costs, increase transparency, and improve the quality of services that they offer to citizens and businesses. Doing this in a coordinated way ensures that the public sector is not only digital but also interoperable. The EU framework published today will help Member States to follow a common approach when making their public services available online, also across countries and policy areas. This will contribute to reducing bureaucracy for people and businesses, for example, when requesting certificates, enrolling to services, or handing in tax declarations.
  • Carbon Black warns of over reliance on 'nascent' machine learning security

    Security professionals cited high false positive rates and the ease with which machine learning-based technologies can be bypassed – at present – as the most serious barriers to adoption.

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