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Ubuntu 10.10 Beta 1 and a Dell M4500

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It would be silly to have such a computer just sitting around, so it was decided this was my next laptop for the rest of the time. With the option of two internal drives (and SSD card + a standard 2.5inch, 7200 rpm disk) dual booting would be easy, and maintaining the ADDM appliance to keep it current would be something I would be able to do all the time because I would always have it with me. A win-win.

Ubuntu 10.10 Beta 1

I wondered how well such a new technology laptop would work with Linux. Linux will sooner or later support everything, but on bleeding edge hardware, if the manufacturer of the internal devices, like the wireless card, have not released open source versions of their drivers, then it can sometimes be a bit of trouble getting things going.

Ubuntu works around most of those issues, and Mint does even more, but they do so at the cost of "purity". I am not a purist about my Linux, so this does not matter to me: I just want it to work. Others in the Linux community live and die by whether or not a device has unencumbered drivers.

I figured 10.10 was a good place to start:

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