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Leaving CrunchBang Linux for Lubuntu

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu

I first migrated to CrunchBang Linux because they kept talking about it on Linux Outlaws. Specifically they mentioned how fast it was and, if I recall correctly, Fab was using it on his netbook. My laptop battery life was quickly dwindling so, if I wanted to be able to use it on a plane, I needed a fast-booting distro. I enjoyed Crunchbang and the neat way it was setup. I loved just hitting Win-W to launch Firefox. Conky was really neat Terminator was the best term program I’d ever used. But it was getting a little long in the tooth. The most recent stable version was at least a year old if not 18 months old. It wasn’t keeping up with the Ubuntu releases. I was stuck using Firefox 3.0 (or some other such old version) Then came the announcement they were switching to a Debian base. Even if I stuck with CrunchBang, I’d be forced to reinstall anyway. So I decided to give Lubuntu a shot. I knew Ubuntu was too resource-heavy for my crappy battery life. I looked around and Lubuntu seemed to be the lightest – even lighter than Xubuntu. Could it match CrunchBang? CrunchBang took ten seconds from login to usable desktop and about 30 seconds until wifi was up.

I popped in the installation disc and wifi worked perfectly. The default theme looked very nice. I’ve commented before that I really like a nice distro. It just really speaks to me on a subconscious level. It doesn’t matter that themes are easily reconfigurable. I’ve always had a soft spot for Mandriva because of its great default themes. It succeeded in being fast enough. Login to a usable desktop took 6 seconds after entering my password. Wifi was also up in a reasonable amount of time after entering the password. No desktop icons by default, but I don’t care – there weren’t any in CrunchBang either.

rest here




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