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Announcing Smeegol 1.0

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SUSE

Smeegol is based on the netbook user interface that came from the MeeGo(TM)* project. Smeegol offers the latest Banshee’s powerful music player, a newer Evolution Express as mail and agenda client and several additional social networks.

The MeeGo project, a collaborative effort by Nokia, Intel and a quickly growing community of volunteers under the umbrella of the Linux Foundation, aims to create an operating system designed for small-formfactor devices with limited computing power and screen estate. Think about platforms such as netbooks/entry-level desktops, handheld computing and communications devices, in-vehicle infotainment devices, connected TVs, and media phones. Novell is a part of the MeeGo effort, working with the Linux Foundation on their build infrastructure and official MeeGo products. MeeGo is using increasingly more openSUSE technology, including zypper and other system management tools.

Smeegol is an openSUSE volunteer effort by the Goblin Team to create an openSUSE interpretation of the MeeGo(TM)* user experience, offering the compelling advantages of the openSUSE infrastructure.

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