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Thank you, Linux! My Windows computer is infected

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft
Security
Humor

That's right. My desktop, which runs Windows, is infected and I blame Linux.

As it normally happens in these cases, this new infection in my XP system can be traced back to user carelessness. However, I think that calling me "careless" is not fair for I did everything on the book (and more!) to keep a Windows machine healthy:

1. I have an updated antivirus, which runs full scans when I turn the PC on.
2. My firewall was up and running.
3. I have additional anti-malware software for protection.
4. Firefox is my browser and I installed add-ons for extra security.
5. I neither open suspicious email attachments nor visit questionable sites.

Since I was not careless, I am not the culprit. However, if I did something wrong, this is it:

res there




User's fault entirely

If you download an infected file to your machine, it is your fault. If you use autoplay in Windows, it is your fault. If you can't use Windows properly, it is your fault.

Fancy titles = lots of clicks; this post proves it.

User's fault?

@Snoochie

So you said, "If you download an infected file to your machine, it is your fault. If you use autoplay in Windows, it is your fault. If you can't use Windows properly, it is your fault."

What?
It is the fault of the user who downloads a file which turns out to be infected, and the windows system didn't detect and warn and/or stop the infection?
Using your windows system as designed for ease of use (autoplay) becomes the user's fault?
Having taken all the precautions expected, (and beyond the usual) and a windows infection happens, it is the user's fault?
This is not a fair critique.
I know, I know...I can hear you say you have used your current windows setup for years without any infection.
But you have to be on constant alert, deny yourself the whole, wide range of the Internet and avoid those cute, huggable-bunny vids that your grandma attached to her email to you because they may have a windows virus.
That is too much work and worry for me, a happy Linux Mint user!

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