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Should Microsoft rollover and play dead to OpenOffice?

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Microsoft
OOo

OK all of you Microsoft haters, take your bloomers back down from being twisted around your necks. Microsoft put out a YouTube bashing a competitor and everyone is yelling that Microsoft went back on their word and they hate Open Source after all. Is Microsoft not allowed to compete against open source alternatives? Of course they are. In doing so it does not mean they hate open source.

My friend, fellow Open Source Net blogger and editor, Julie Bort started the drums ringing with her article bemoaning that Microsoft was trying "to scare users away from Open Office". She wants Microsoft to "snap out of it". But Julie's reaction is actually pale to some of the others around the web. Over on ZDNet the reaction is that Microsoft was just paying lip service to open source all this time and their true colors have come out once again.

The ZDNet article is particularly funny because he defends open source with much of the same old tired arguments that we have seen between Microsoft and the open source community in the past. In response to Microsoft's claim about lack of commercial support for OpenOffice, the ZDNet blogger responds:

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Microsoft-phobic

networkworld.com: My fellow open source subnet blogger Joe Brockmeier came to the defense of OpenOffice pretty quickly after I wrote my previous post, that Microsoft has every right to compete against OpenOffice. Of course Joe is an old open source warrior. But like many warriors, Joe is busy fighting the the last war instead of the next one. Microsoft is not the enemy they should worry about. It is probably Google Office or some other cloud based office suite which will be the next competitor.

I read and re-read Joe's retort a few times. As near as I can tell, Joe's points seem to be:

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problem is

Microsoft "competes" like politicians campaign.

instead of telling us what they are bringing to the table and how it is a good thing, they instead focus on trying to bring down the others in the race.

That's not competition, that's hiding how bad your "product" or service or agenda is behind trying to make someone or something else look worse.

It's deception and deflection.

not even close to actual "competition".

mudslinging is not competition.

And no, Microsoft is most certainly not the only company out there that mudslings instead of competes. It's pretty much the corporate defacto anymore.

sad sad sad.

"Advertising"

That of MS is not advertising. I've never seen Ford "advertising" by saying "Toyota sucks", they would probably be sued. MS is legalised mafia and we - as civilized citizens - have every right to despise them.

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