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Oracle Asks Founders Of The Documents Foundation To Leave

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OOo

After Oracle acquired SUN Microsystem, some leading members of the OpenOffice.org community forked OpenOffice.org as LibreOffice. They also set up The Document Foundation to continue the independent works of the OpenOffice.org community.

However, Oracle is not taking their move well. They want the founders of The Documents Foundation to leave the OpenOffice.org council. According to Oracle, their works with The Documents Foundation and LibreOffice will conflict with that of OpenOffice.org.

rest here (and here)




Also: Oracle Sucks Up to OpenOffice.org

Maybe Oracle without intention did a good thing?

Open Office didn't develop as fast as some would have liked it to. Some though its organisation lacked efficiency. Maybe Oracle's unorthodox conflict with developers will spark new life into the project, now as Libre Office?

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