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The KDE Netbook Desktop

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KDE

I wrote a few days ago about Kubuntu on Netbooks. After a few days of experimentation and discovery, I'm going to continue and expand that topic to the KDE Netbook Desktop in general.

I first installed the KDE Netbook Desktop (via Kubuntu 10.10) on my Samsung N150 Plus. I assumed that it would not be terribly interesting or useful on my HP 2133 Mini-Note netbooks, because of the limited graphic support for the VIA Chrome9 graphic controller. That assumption was also based on the fact that the Ubuntu Netbook Edition, with the new Unity desktop, would not even install on the Mini-Note. However, after seeing how NDE Netbook worked on the Samsung (and basically being blown away by it), and seeing how it handles and configures desktop effects, I started to think that it might actually work pretty well on the Mini-Note despite the limited graphics. So I set out to investigate the possibilities...

Fortunately, I realized that KDE does not have the complete separation of the "normal" and "netbook" desktops, as Ubuntu and UNE do; KDE 4.5 includes both desktops in the standard distribution. Even more fortunately, I already had PCLinuxOS 2010 installed on one of the Mini-Notes, which of course includes KDE 4.5, so I booted that up, went to System Settings / Workspace, selected Netbook Desktop, and ZOWIE! This is what I got:

rest here




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