Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

The KDE Netbook Desktop

Filed under
KDE

I wrote a few days ago about Kubuntu on Netbooks. After a few days of experimentation and discovery, I'm going to continue and expand that topic to the KDE Netbook Desktop in general.

I first installed the KDE Netbook Desktop (via Kubuntu 10.10) on my Samsung N150 Plus. I assumed that it would not be terribly interesting or useful on my HP 2133 Mini-Note netbooks, because of the limited graphic support for the VIA Chrome9 graphic controller. That assumption was also based on the fact that the Ubuntu Netbook Edition, with the new Unity desktop, would not even install on the Mini-Note. However, after seeing how NDE Netbook worked on the Samsung (and basically being blown away by it), and seeing how it handles and configures desktop effects, I started to think that it might actually work pretty well on the Mini-Note despite the limited graphics. So I set out to investigate the possibilities...

Fortunately, I realized that KDE does not have the complete separation of the "normal" and "netbook" desktops, as Ubuntu and UNE do; KDE 4.5 includes both desktops in the standard distribution. Even more fortunately, I already had PCLinuxOS 2010 installed on one of the Mini-Notes, which of course includes KDE 4.5, so I booted that up, went to System Settings / Workspace, selected Netbook Desktop, and ZOWIE! This is what I got:

rest here




More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

Mobie Is a Tablet That Dual-Boots Ubuntu 14.04 LTS and Windows 8.1

Mobie is a new kind of 2-in-1 tablet developed in Finland that is capable to dual-boot Ubuntu 14.04 LTS and Windows 8.1. It's being launched in a couple of months and it already looks very good, at least on paper. Read more

Can or Can’t?

What I love about open source is that it’s a “can” world by default. You can do anything you think needs doing and nobody will tell you that you can’t. (They may not take your patch but they won’t tell you that you can’t create it!) It’s often easier to define things by what they are not or what we can’t do. And the danger of that is you create a culture of “can’t”. Any one who has raised kids or animals knows this. “No, don’t jump.” You can’t jump on people. “No, off the sofa.” You can’t be on the furniture. “No, don’t lick!” You can’t slobber on me. And hopefully when you realize it, you can fix it. “You can have this stuffed animal (instead of my favorite shoe). Good dog!” Read more

IT pros to move to open source software in 2015

IT professionals are expected to move away from proprietary to open source software in 2015, according to new research. A survey by Ponemon Institute and Zimbra shows 67 per cent of EMEA IT professionals agree that commercial open source software offers better business continuity. 74 per cent in the US also agree open source is better for business continuity, compared to propriety software. Read more