Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Unity: what does this mean for GNOME?

Filed under
Software
Ubuntu

At this stage, most people will have heard the news: Ubuntu 11.04 will ship with Unity as the default desktop shell. This raises a few questions: what does this mean for GNOME, and the adoption of GNOME Shell? Will this further affect the relationship between Canonical developers and others working on the same problems?

First things first: what Canonical is doing here is not new, by any means. Novell developed the slab on their own, based on their user testing and to their own design, before proposing it for inclusion in GNOME once it was released in Suse Linux Enterprise Desktop. Nokia have developed custom user interfaces.

In such illustrious company, forgive me if I think that Canonical’s management has seriously underestimated the difficulty of the task in front of them.

rest here




What a bunch of B.S!

They are not going to switch to Unity Interface for 11.04. This is just something they threw out to get some buzz going about Ubuntu and get their userbase all riled up and talking about Ubuntu.

re: bs

augh, dirty rats! I hate being manipulated.

There sure is a lot of angry users over their announcement. I figured this could be the beginning of the end of their dominance if they really go through with it.

A lot of people won't be able to adapt to such a different interface and it will require ample hardware with 3D acceleration.

Oh, as far as your theory: They put Sam Spilsbury on the payroll. That kinda sounds like a commitment.

Same ole same

srlinuxx wrote:
augh, dirty rats! I hate being manipulated.

There sure is a lot of angry users over their announcement. I figured this could be the beginning of the end of their dominance if they really go through with it.

A lot of people won't be able to adapt to such a different interface and it will require ample hardware with 3D acceleration.

Oh, as far as your theory: They put Sam Spilsbury on the payroll. That kinda sounds like a commitment.

Remember the ugly wallpaper with the orange splotches they said was going to be the default wallpaper that got people all riled up then they changed it. Same ole crap.

Unity

So they forked off eventually... well it was in the air, and for a number of reasons it was their only possible way forward.

Reading in depth about this decision, one can see that it's a very well engineered move. The skin is what the market is going towards, it's something people is getting accustomed to with Android and the iPad; pimp it up with Compiz C++ (a great piece of code) and you have a full blown desktop UI that people will want, and something the Linux desktop sorely needs to go forward.

Compiz C++ is very hardware friendly and efficient and will work on older rigs, while being perfectly in line with the times or ahead on newer machines. This is why it's going to be the WM for Unity.

This is going to work out well, and kill Gnome Shell before it is born. Unfortunately they had no other choice, it's simply impossible to develop a great home desktop with the Gnome community, because it's made up mostly by Red Hat developers that don't give a damn about the home desktop. And they will fence Canonical off even if the latter want to contribute by demanding that every proposal be submitted as design intent and then go through their own process, a process where the home desktop does not matter.

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

GNU/Linux and Servers

Kernel Space: Linux, Graphics

Leftovers: Software and Games

  • Best Linux remote desktop clients: Top 5 RDC in 2017
    This article was provided to TechRadar by Linux Format, the number one magazine to boost your knowledge on Linux, open source developments, distro releases and much more. Subscribe to the print or digital version of Linux Format here. SSH has been the staple remote access tool for the sysadmins since its advent. The cryptographic network protocol is synonymous with remote network services over an unsecured network. Admins use SSH to mount remote directories, backup remote servers, spring-clean remote databases, and even forward X11 connections. The popularity of single-board computers, such as the Raspberry Pi, has introduced SSH into the parlance of the everyday desktop users as well.
  • A Powerful Dual-Pane File Manager `Double Commander` New Update for Ubuntu/Linux Mint
    Double Commander is a powerful open source & cross platform file manager, inspired from total commander file manager but includes new ideas and features. It brings dual pane side by side experience to enhance the use of GUI for the user. The main window of the application is separated by two panels side by side that allow you to view the content of two different location or same and browse through folders with ease. For each file, image or folder, details such as name, extension, size, date and attributes are displayed in the list.
  • SoftMaker Office 2016 – Your alternative to LibreOffice?
    Depending on how you look at it, the world of office suites for Linux is either very rich or very poor. As the rather obscure idiom says: the tailor (hence the cliche suit reference) always goes naked. But in essence, you’re either using LibreOffice – used to be OpenOffice – or maybe something else. Probably nothing. However, there are quite a few office products for Linux: Kingsoft Office, SoftMaker Office, Calligra, standalone Abiword, some others, each offering a slightly different aesthetic and functional approach. We talked about this in the office suite competition article back in 2013, and a lot has changed since. LibreOffice finally became suitable for use side by side with Microsoft Office, as far as decent document conversion and fidelity go, and every one of these products has seen a large number of major and minor number increments. In the original piece, SoftMaker Office was kind of a dud, and it’s time to give it a full review. Let us.
  • Reports: PS4 is selling twice as well as Xbox One, overall [Ed: Xbox continues to be a loser]
    Microsoft stopped providing concrete sales data for its Xbox line years ago, making it hard to get a read on just how well the Xbox One is doing in the market compared to Sony's PlayStation 4. Recent numbers released by analysts this week, though, suggest that Sony continues to dominate this generation of the console wars, with the PS4 now selling twice as many units worldwide as the Xbox One since both systems launched in late 2013. The first set of numbers comes from a new SuperData report on the Nintendo Switch, which offhandedly mentions an installed base of 26 million Xbox One units and 55 million PS4 units. That report is backed up by Niko Partners analyst Daniel Ahmad, who recently tweeted a chart putting estimated Xbox One sales somewhere near the middle of the 25 million to 30 million range.
  • PPSSPP (PSP) Emulator 1.3.0 Version Released, Install in Ubuntu/Linux Mint
    PPSSPP is a PSP emulator written in C++, and translates PSP CPU instructions directly into optimized x86, x64 and ARM machine code, using JIT recompilers (dynarecs). PPSSPP is an open source project, licensed under the GPL. PPSSPP can run your PSP games on your PC in full HD resolution, it is cross-platform application. It can even upscale textures that would otherwise be too blurry as they were made for the small screen of the original PSP.

Security Leftovers