Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Hacking Damn Vulnerable Linux

Filed under
Linux

If you can't exploit it, you can't secure it. I don't know if that quote has been said before, but if you are deeply interested about computer security or ethical hacking, that should be your main mantra. To fully learn how to secure a computer program, you must know how to break it and find vulnerabilities. In relation to this, there is a unique Linux distribution that is primarily created to help teach you about software security, its name is Damn Vulnerable Linux (DVL).

Damn Vulnerable Linux is a Slackware-based distro that is intentionally loaded with broken, ill-configured, outdated, and exploitable software for educational purposes. It is a 1.8GB live DVD that features easily breakable versions of Apache, MySQL, PHP, and FTP and SSH daemons. It also includes a good number of tools to help users compile, debug, and break applications running on these services such as GCC, GDB, NASM, strace, ELF Shell, DDD, LDasm, LIDa, etc. You can install Damn Vulnerable Linux natively on a PC, boot it from a USB flash drive, or install it using any virtualization software.

rest here




More in Tux Machines

Ubuntu Touch OTA-6 Received Well by Ubuntu Phone Users, Work on OTA-7 Starts

As Łukasz Zemczak is currently in a two-week holiday, Canonical's Timo Jyrinki sent the usual report to inform us all about the good and bad things that happened in the Ubuntu Touch world. Read more

Ubuntu 15.10 (Wily Werewolf) to Ship with OpenStack Liberty

Canonical's James Page posted an interesting message on the Ubuntu mailing list, informing all Ubuntu developers about the steps they need to take in order to update the OpenStack cloud software to version 2015.2.0 (Liberty) in Ubuntu 15.10. Read more

Mark Shuttleworth Details Ubuntu 15.10 Highlights [VIDEO]

Ubuntu developers are closing in on the next major release, with the Ubuntu 15.10 Wily Werewolf set to debut on October 22. Ubuntu 15.10 is in many respects an incremental release ahead of the 16.04 Long Term Support release in 2016. Among the key innovations in 15.10 is wider use of the Snappy technology for packaging, though it won't replace the core .deb packaging system anytime soon, if ever. Read more

Improving Security for Bugzilla

Openness, transparency, and security are all central to the Mozilla mission. That’s why we publish security bugs once they’re no longer dangerous, and it’s why we’re writing a blog post about unauthorized access to our infrastructure. We have notified the relevant law enforcement authorities about this incident, and may take additional steps based on the results of any further investigations. Read more