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Tech That Tried to Kill Us!

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Movies
Humor

For Halloween, we've rounded up the ways horror has tried to use tech to kill us. Text messages from the dead, TV waves that destroy your brain, even evil EVP. The bottom line is that true creep factor is a well-written plot, expertly paced scenes and deeply disturbing imagery -- not a possessed iPad or rogue radio.

White Noise (2005)

Good news, guys: we've found Michael Keaton! It's been years since he donned the Batsuit or got Jack Frosted, but that's because he's been spending his time tuned into the radio waves, attempting to locate his dead wife. But some cranky ghosts are upset that Mikey's been prying into their private time. What Keaton believes are his wife's plaintive cries are actually impassioned warnings against playing with the afterlife (and were painfully obvious to all of us).

Pulse (2006)

Kristen Bell is Mattie, a normal college student with normal boyfriend problems. Well, mostly. He's been MIA for a week, and keeps calling and hanging up. But, really, he's unlocked a portal to the realm of the life-sucking dead through his extra-curricular hacking, and has wound up killing himself.

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