Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Slackware review

Filed under
Slack

One of the most common statements about Slackware is that, it is difficult to maintain, and not user friendly. This is only partially true and depends on what is easy for you. If you know nothing about Linux then it may be complicated to start with Slackware, but if you know a little bit about Linux, then it could actually be easier to have a server on Slackware than for example Fedora or Ubuntu. Why?. Well mainly because it is more difficult to break things in Slackware than in others, the lack of a dependency resolution official tool, makes installing and maintaining software more time consuming, but at the same time, more stable. So if easy for you means less time finding and installing software, then Slackware is not easy, but if on the other hand easy for you, means less problems and down times, then Slackware may be your solution.

So, Slackware is not for experienced users only, but it certainly doesn’t do everything for you like Ubuntu, Fedora, PCLinuxOS or others.

Packages

Introduction

All packages in slackware are vanilla, it does not have the huge number of packages available as in Debian, but you can always compile them by yourself. To compile the software not officially available in Slackware repository we have the great help of slackbuilds.org. This is a community driven project, where you can find scripts to create the Slackware binaries from the original sources.

rest here




More in Tux Machines

New OpenStack Ocata stabilizes popular open-source cloud

Usually, it would be another couple of months before the open-source OpenStack Foundation cloud released a new version of its cloud software. This time around the OpenStack community released the latest version, Ocata, on a one-time, shorter cycle. This release is focused on improving stability, scalability, and performance of the core compute and networking services. Read more

Radeon vs. NVIDIA Performance For HITMAN On Linux With 17 GPUs

Last week Feral Interactive released the much anticipated Linux port of HITMAN, which debuted for Windows last year. Now that there's benchmark support for HITMAN on Linux, I have been running a number of tests for this game that's powered by the Glacier Engine and making use of OpenGL for rendering on Linux. In this article are our initial AMD Radeon performance figures making use of the RadeonSI Gallium3D driver compared to NVIDIA's driver and the assortment of GeForce results published yesterday. Read more

How China Mobile Is Using Linux and Open Source

China Mobile is one of the biggest telecom companies in the world, with more than 800 million users in China -- all of whom are served with open source technologies. During the 2016 Mobile World Congress, China Mobile declared that the operational support system running their massive network would be based on open source software. China Mobile is not alone; many major networking vendors are moving to open source technologies. For example, AT&T is building their future network on top of OpenStack, and they have invested in software-defined technology so significantly that they now call themselves a software company. Read more

Today in Techrights