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7 Best User-Made Screenlets For Linux

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Software

If you’ve never tried desktop screenlets, you’re missing out. We’ve previously discussed how to set up your screenlets, but we’ve never put together a showcase of the best ones. Today we’ve gathered seven of the best from Screenlets.org, and they cover everything from audio eye candy to steampunk system monitors. If you’re finding your desktop lacking in flash or functionality, look no further.

Getting Screenlet Support

The screenlets package is available in the standard repositories of several major distributions including Ubuntu. If you cannot find it in your system’s package manager (such as Ubuntu Software Center), it can be downloaded manually here.

As noted in the introductory paragraph, further setup of screenlets has been discussed on MakeTechEasier before. If you need more assistance, check out Damien’s article here.

1. Circle Sensors

While not particularly impressive in functionality, Circle Sensors can really make system monitoring gorgeous. The design is very similar to the Ring Sensors screenlet, but using a solid ring instead of one broken into chunks. I believe this gives it a much cleaner and more pleasant look.

rest here




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