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Maintenance Release - pclinuxos zen mini 2010.10

Filed under
Linux

Release Date: 10-28-2010
Size: 330 MB
Md5Sum: 1d53cf500db02eab4bbc1e0df79e3440
Produced by: Siamer
User Level: Intermediate, Advanced

The GNOME Desktop: a popular, multi-platform desktop environment for your computer. GNOME’s focus is ease of use, stability, and first-class internationalization and accessibility support. GNOME is Free and Open Source Software and provides all of the common tools computer users expect of a modern computing environment, such as e-mail, web browsing, file management, multimedia, and games.

Zen Mini is a minimal Gnome Desktop with a minimum of applications giving you the freedom to install and use the applications of your choice from our software repository.

Features:
Kernel 2.6.33.7-bfs kernel for maximum desktop performance.
Minimal Gnome 2.32.0 Desktop.
Wireless support for many network devices.
Addlocale allows you to convert PCLinuxOS into over 60 languages.
GetOpenOffice can install Open Office supporting over 100 languages.
MyLiveCD allows you to take a snapshot of your installation and burn it to a LiveCD/DVD.

Performance
Kernel 2.6.33.7-pclos6.bfs kernel. The bfs kernel uses a customized scheduler from Con Kolivas. The magnum 357 bfs patchset is utilized for maximum desktop performance in a multitasking environment. This provides smooth multimedia playback even under heavy loads.

Prelinking - Applications have been prelinked to provide faster start times.

Speedboot - ported from Mandriva makes getting to your desktop faster than ever.

Appearance
The Zen-Mini desktop theme designed by Siamer features a black and silver theme with Chinese lettering meaning balance.

System requirements:
* x86 processor (PCLinuxOS Zen-mini is a 32-bit OS that works on both 32-bit and 64-bit processors).
* Great for modern and older computers with limited memory
* 384 MB of system memory (RAM)
* 3 GB of disk space for installation
* Graphics card capable of 800×600 resolution
* CD-ROM drive or USB port

More information and download links located at:

http://www.pclinuxos.com/?page_id=186

Please note: You do not need to download and install this release if you have been keeping up with your updates on a 2010.07 Zen Mini install. This is mainly for those new to PCLinuxOS Zen Mini so they don't have so many downloads to perform to get updated to current status.

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