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Maintenance Release - pclinuxos phoenix xfce 2010.10

Filed under
Linux

Release Date: 10-28-2010
Size: 640 MB
MD5Sum: 50cf18f74a22ce491d65e92d13736665
Produced by: Joble
User Level: Intermediate, Advanced

PCLinuxOS Phoenix Xfce Edition features the lightweight but fully functional Xfce desktop environment. Is it designed for productivity. It load and executes applications fast while conserving system resources.

Features:
Kernel 2.6.33.7-bfs kernel for maximum desktop performance.
Full Xfce 4.6.2 Desktop.
Nvidia and ATI fglrx driver support.
Multimedia playback support for many popular formats.
Wireless support for many network devices.
Printer support for many local and networked printer devices.
Addlocale allows you to convert PCLinuxOS into over 60 languages.
GetOpenOffice can install Open Office supporting over 100 languages.
MyLiveCD allows you to take a snapshot of your installation and burn it to a LiveCD/DVD.
PCLinuxOS-liveusb – allows you to install PCLinuxOS on a USB key disk.

Performance
Kernel 2.6.33.7-pclos6.bfs kernel. The bfs kernel uses a customized scheduler from Con Kolivas. The magnum 357 bfs patchset is utilized for maximum desktop performance in a multitasking environment. This provides smooth multimedia playback even under heavy loads.

Prelinking - Applications have been prelinked to provide faster start times.

Speedboot - ported from Mandriva makes getting to your desktop faster than ever.

Appearance
The Phoenix XFCE desktop theme designed by Sproggy features the traditional PCLinuxOS color scheme with a unique boot splash and background.

System requirements:
* x86 processor (PCLinuxOS XFCE is a 32-bit OS that works on both 32-bit and 64-bit processors).
* Great for modern and older computers with limited memory
* 384 MB of system memory (RAM)
* 3 GB of disk space for installation
* Graphics card capable of 800×600 resolution
* CD-ROM drive or USB port

More information and download links located at:

http://www.pclinuxos.com/?page_id=213

Please note: You do not need to download and install this release if you have been keeping up with your updates on a 2010.07 XFCE install. This is mainly for those new to PCLinuxOS XFCE so they don't have so many downloads to perform to get updated to current status.

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