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Shuttleworth: critics would do well to get a clue

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Ubuntu

Few people in the free and open source software these days have to put up with as much criticism of their motives and moves as the owner of Canonical, Mark Shuttleworth.

The latest round of barbs have been thrown at him because he decided to change the user interface of the next release of Ubuntu to Unity, abandoning the old GNOME UI.

A few days later, he announced that Ubuntu would be gradually transitioning to the Wayland server, leaving the old X behind.

To the logical mind, it is quite clear why Shuttleworth has taken these steps. He has tried, for some time, unsuccessfully, to get upstream projects to follow his vision for what GNU/Linux on devices - the desktop, the notebook, the netbook, the plethora of mobiles - should look and feel like.

Having failed to convince anyone, he has now decided that if Ubuntu is to continue to make headway, it has to distinguish itself from the rest. His model is Apple, which, despite having a much smaller share of the market than Microsoft, is still a major force with which to reckon in the tech space.

rest here




Rich boy toy.

He don't care. He is just a rich boy playing with his toy. That is it in a nutshell.

Clone

Tell me you don't see the similarity

http://www.mikemet.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/12/mark_shuttleworth.jpg

http://www.iwatchstuff.com/2009/07/08/macgruber.jpg

critics

Shrugs

critics

Big Grin

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