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Maintenance Release - pclinuxos gnome 2010.11

Filed under
Linux

Release Date: 11-11-2010
Size: 685 MB
Md5Sum: 44f80d27e30c37bae4f5e505d77a3a3f
Produced by: slax
User Level: Beginner, Intermediate, Advanced

Info: The GNOME Desktop: a popular, multi-platform desktop environment for your computer. GNOME's focus is ease of use, stability, and first-class internationalization and accessibility support. GNOME is Free and Open Source Software and provides all of the common tools computer users expect of a modern computing environment, such as e-mail, web browsing, file management, multimedia, and games.

Features:
Kernel 2.6.33.7bfs kernel for maximum desktop performance.
Full Gnome 2.32.0 Desktop
Nvidia and ATI fglrx driver support.
Multimedia playback support for many popular formats.
Wireless support for many network devices.
Printer support for many local and networked printer devices.
Addlocale allows you to convert PCLinuxOS into over 60 languages.
GetOpenOffice can install Open Office supporting over 100 languages.
MyLiveCD allows you to take a snapshot of your installation and burn it to a LiveCD/DVD.

Performance
Kernel 2.6.33.7-pclos6.bfs kernel. The bfs kernel uses a customized scheduler from Con Kolivas. The magnum 357 bsf patchset is utilized for maximum desktop performance in a multitasking environment. This provides smooth multimedia playback even under heavy loads.

Prelinking - Applications have been prelinked to provide faster start times.

Nscd - caching name server is preloaded and enabled to provide a faster browsing experience.

Speedboot - ported from Mandriva makes getting to your desktop faster than ever.

Appearance
A complete makeover of the Gnome desktop with new icons, wallpaper, gtk2 theme and more.

More information and download links located at:

http://www.pclinuxos.com/?page_id=184

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