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VMware Server goes free (but not open)

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Software

As expected, VMware Inc. announced on February 6th that it was releasing a no-cost version of its VMware Server line.

While not open-source, this entry-level virtualization server enables users to partition x86 and x86-64 Linux and Windows servers into multiple virtual machines (VMs). Server administrators can either roll their own servers or use such pre-built servers as IBM WSE (Workplace Services Express), MySQL, or Oracle 10G.

The company also claims that VMware Server can be used to host legacy OSes such as Windows NT Server 4.0 and Windows 2000 Server.

The server VMware is offering is actually a beta release of VM Server. This, in turn, is the successor program to the company's entry-level VM server, VMware GSX.

GSX has been listing for $1,694 for a dual-CPU license, and $3,388 for an unlimited processor license. VMware Server, in contrast, costs nothing but is restricted to use on single CPU systems.

The final version of VMware Server is scheduled to appear in the first half of 2006. At that time, the firm will also offer paid support and subscription options.

Full Article.

In related news:

VMware plans to make available a free entry-level virtualization server this quarter but will delay the delivery of its highly anticipated ESX3 and VirtualCenter 2 until the second quarter.

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