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A Class-Action Lawsuit In the Making: No Windows 7 Refund

Filed under
Microsoft

I recently purchased a Toshiba Satellite L675 laptop from Best Buy with the explicit intention of installing the 64-bit Fedora 14 GNU/Linux operating system on it. I talked to the resident "Geek Squad" guy and told him that I had absolutely no intention or desire to EVER run Windows 7 on the laptop. So my question is this: why should I have to pay for a piece of software that I have no intention of ever using? I told the "Geek" that I intended to install Fedora 14 on the laptop, and that I wanted a refund for the pre-installed Windows 7. He informed me that it was Best Buy's policy that they would not and could not issue a refund. I purchased the laptop, got it home, and refused to accept the Windows 7 licensing agreement. I wiped Windows from the hard drive and proceeded to install Fedora. The laptop came with Windows 7 Home Premium. Below are key excerpts from the Licensing Agreement:

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