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Richard Stallman on P2P

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Richard Stallman is the creator of the Free Software movement, the founder of the GNU project and the Free Software Foundation. He has written several programs used in almost all GNU/Linux distributions, such as the GNU C Compiler, the GNU Emacs editor and the GNU Debugger, amongst others. He wrote the GNU GPL, and is also currently co-authoring version 3 of the GPL. He also gave POSIX it's name, the term used to mean most UNIX-like operating systems today. We asked him for his opinions on File Sharing, DRM and some other subjects.

LinuxP2P: What is your general opinion of Peer to Peer File-Sharing? Is it a positive or negative thing, and why?

RMS: People have a right to share copies of published works; P2P programs are simply a means to do it more usefully, and that is a good thing.

LinuxP2P: The recording and movie industries claim that P2P users infringe on their intellectual property. In your opinion, is this correct, or are the users exercising fair use?

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