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“Microsoft is working towards establishing a long-term community connection”

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Microsoft
Interviews
OSS

“Microsoft is open to openness,” says Vijay Rajagopalan, principal architect in Microsoft’s interoperability team. The LINUX For You team caught up with him to find out the truth behind this assertion, and to learn more about just how serious Microsoft’s engagement was with open source projects and the community. We also wanted to find out more about the firm’s initiatives towards supporting the software development ecosystem.

Q Over the years, we have seen Microsoft becoming more and more focused on establishing a connection with the open source community. What has been the reason behind this?

We understand that open source software alternatives can represent healthy competition and an opportunity to complement or enhance Microsoft technologies and products.

We also share the common industry view that software users will continue to see a mixed IT environment of open source and proprietary products, for years to come.

We recognise the value of openness when working with others (including open source communities), to help customers and partners succeed in today’s heterogeneous IT environments. This includes increasing opportunities for developers to learn and create, by combining community oriented open source with traditional commercial approaches to software development.

Hence, the company is working towards establishing a long-term community connection, and is also trying to build bridges between Microsoft and non-Microsoft technologies.

rest here




Of course M.S. I believe you.

NOT! Lair lair pants on fire!

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