Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

4 Reasons to Try LibreOffice

Filed under
LibO

The Document Foundation on Sunday announced the availability of the first release candidate of LibreOffice, marking the approach of the first stable version of the brand-new open source productivity suite.

Coming just a few weeks after the software's third beta version, the new release candidate is now available for download for Linux, Windows and Mac OS X. The release is not yet intended for production systems, as there are still some known issues. Nevertheless, it's the closest look we've had at the software since The Document Foundation announced its "fork" of the popular OpenOffice.org package.

Many of the major Linux distributions will be replacing OpenOffice with LibreOffice once the final release is available, so there's no better time to check out the new software. Here are just a few reasons why you should.

rest here




I've been running the betas for about three weeks now,

and have had no troubles or formatting issues in making new or opening old documents with Writer or Impress.

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

Linux and Graphics: Linux Weather Forecast, DRM, XDC2017, Mesa, and NVIDIA

  • Linux Weather Forecast
    This page is an attempt to track ongoing developments in the Linux development community that have a good chance of appearing in a mainline kernel and/or major distributions sometime in the near future. Your "chief meteorologist" is Jonathan Corbet, Executive Editor at LWN.net. If you have suggestions on improving the forecast (and particularly if you have a project or patchset that you think should be tracked), please add your comments below.
  • A New DRM Driver Is Coming For Linux 4.15
    TVE200 is a new Direct Rendering Manager driver being queued for Linux 4.15. The TVE200 DRM driver is for the Faraday Tech TVE200 "TV encoder" block. This mini driver was written by Linus Walleij of Linaro.
  • XDC2017 Kicks Off With X.Org, Wayland & Graphics Talks
    The X.Org Developers Conference kicked off a short time ago at the Googleplex in Mountain View, CA. But even if you are not at the event, there is a livestream.
  • Mesa Sees An Initial Meson Build System Port
    A few months ago was a vibrant discussion about a Meson proposal for libdrm/Mesa while today the initial patches were posted in bringing a possible Meson build system port for Mesa.
  • NVIDIA Offers Update On Their Proposed Unix Device Memory Allocation Library
    James Jones of NVIDIA presented this morning at XDC2017 with their annual update on a new Unix device memory allocation library. As a reminder, this library originated from NVIDIA's concerns over the Generic Buffer Manager (GBM) currently used by Wayland compositors not being suitable for use with their driver's architecture and then the other driver developers not being interested in switching to EGLStreams, NVIDIA's original push for supporting Wayland.
  • NVIDIA Legacy Linux Drivers Updated With Newer Kernel Support
    NVIDIA has issued new releases of its two legacy drivers for Linux. The NVIDIA 340.104 driver is now available for older Tesla architecture graphics processors while the NVIDIA 304.137 is out for the GeForce 6 and GeForce 7 generations.

Latest on Google-HTC

Linux: Come for the Kernel, Stay for the Popcorn

Linux offers so much for users to sink their teeth into that even among desktop and more casual users, it's easy to get caught up in the tradecraft. It's only too tempting to put your system's technical capabilities to the test by trying out a new program or practicing a new command. As with any other interest, though, Linux is not much fun unless you can revel in it with fellow fans and enjoy the camaraderie. Here's a short tour of some of the major cultural hallmarks of the vibrant Linux world, and some of the hubs where you can witness and indulge in the Linux life. Read more