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5 Open Source Music Games for GNU/Linux

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Software

Believe it or not, GNU/Linux is already an amazing game platform. You might find this statement entirely implausible or rather incredulous but I really mean it. I didn’t know this until last evening when I was desperately looking for an open source alternative for the popular game “Guitar Hero”. Honestly, I wasn’t expecting much, in fact, I was preparing myself for a total flop, or yet another monotonous copycat of GH. Oh boy… how wrong was I.

For this reason, I’ve decided to compile a list of music games that are available for GNU/Linux.

1- Frets on Fire X

Frets on Fire is probably the most well-implemented open source alternative to guitar-hero alike games. You play the game by holding your keyboard like a guitar and pressing F1 through F5 keys for fretting and pressing RETURN for picking. Although I have to admit that I couldn’t hold my EeePC like that so the game was a bit difficult for me.

Personally I prefer Frets on Fire X (a famous fork of FoF) since it’s much more customizable and you can download copious amount of themes and songs from the community website to embellish the game.

rest here




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