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Opera 11 Is Here - Overview & Screenshots

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Opera 11 was released just a few hours earlier today, and it comes with several notable features, a new interface, and many other improvements. Written using the Qt toolkit and taking advantage of its own Presto engine, the Opera browser has been around for years, and it comes with unique features, which make it a popular browser even among the free software users on the Linux platform, with a respectable third position after Firefox and Google Chrome.

Opera 11 first start

First, let’s see what this new release has to offer, so here’s the news in Opera 11:

* improved address field – the address field now hides long links focusing instead of the main domain name, so you can spot fake websites which try to impersonate a different address; all web pages got a badge to the left to replace protocols like HTTP or HTTPS, also, there is a badge showing if Opera Turbo is turned on or off
* improved Opera auto-update system; checks for updated extensions and Opera Unite applications
* the bookmarks bar is located below the address bar now (this can be changed back in the Appearance dialog)
* availability of improved extensions system; extensions can be created using HTML, CSS and JavaScript
* the mail panel received several notable improvements
* plug-ins can be loaded on demand
* the Presto rendering engine has been improved too with several changes at handling HTML5 and CSS3
* Google search predictions can now be integrated into Opera’s search field
* tab improvements: tabs can be grouped separately now; improved locked tab feature, now renamed to “pin tab”
* user JavaScript improvements
* visual mouse gestures, can be activated by holding down the right mouse button and moving the mouse cursor; Opera will show what gestures are available

http://www.tuxarena.com/?p=169

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