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The Rise of Open Source Software Foundations

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OSS

What do the Linux Foundation, Free Software Foundation, and Apache Project all have in common? They provide a cover for businesses and projects that want to use open source software and contribute to the FOSS community without the risk of stepping on legal landmines or giving up a competitive advantage.

In today’s guest post, Stephen Wallli, technical director at Outercurve Foundation, takes an in-depth look at the variety of benefits opens source software foundations have to offer and why companies should give serious thought to joining one.

The Rise of Open Source Software Foundations

by Stephen Walli, technical director, Outercurve Foundation
Well-run open source software projects remain one of the most efficient and cost-effective ways to develop software by enabling a shared cost of development while providing an open framework for innovation. The abundance of Web-enabled bandwidth available today has broken down traditional barriers, creating a nearly frictionless environment in which software development teams and organizations can collaborate. Unfortunately, a number of barriers still remain that hinder the development and contribution flow into projects run by corporations.

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