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Advantages of OpenSUSE’s YaST Software Management

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SUSE

Different Linux distributions use their own tools for software, or more precisely, package management. As an example, Ubuntu uses its Synaptic, Fedora uses Yum, Gentoo uses Portage, and OpenSUSE uses YaST.

YaST stands for ‘Yet another Setup Tool’. YaST is an easy to use package management system for Linux distributions that support rpm based packages. Although YaST features in many commercial Linux distributions, it is free and open source software released under GPL. Therefore, it is free to be used by any party interested.

YaST features many functionality the advanced package management tools offer. Let’s take the appearance as an example. YaST offers the end users both a GUI front-end as well as CLI front-end. The CLI front-end is especially useful for the installation done through networks where everything is performed through a terminal or a command line interface.

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