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Two Non-buntu Alternatives for your Netbook - Part 1: Fluxflux-sl

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Linux

Chances are several of you, or somebody close to you, got a new netbook over the festive period, and now you are faced with the agonising question what to put on it to make it usable. Chances are the version of Windows that it came with does not really do it for you.

I've dug out two lesser known distributions that are for once not based on Ubuntu or using its repositories, and have nothing to do with Nokia, Intel or Google either. Independent is what we want.

Fluxflux

It appears Fluxflux was once based on PCLinuxOS but has since become a small Slackware-based live distribution. Actually, on closer investigation it turned out to be based on Slax as evidenced in the cheat codes and is put together using the same modular system. One of the two developers, Quax, also seems to be quite active on the Slax forums. The latest stable version at the time of writing is 2010.2, dated from July 2010, which is recent enough to come with the long term supported kernel 2.6.32 and OpenOffice.org 3.2.1, Firefox 3.6.8 and Thunderbird 3.1.1.

rest here




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