Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

GoblinX Premium 2006.1 Tested

Filed under
Linux
Reviews
-s

GoblinX 2006.1 was released a few days ago and On-disk.com treated Tuxmachines to a copy. We've been working on and off for a several days trying to get everything in place to write this review. It's been an uphill battle, to say the least, but finally we are ready to share our experiences.

Goblinx Premium 2006.1 is an installable livecd of one of the most uniquely themed Linux distros available today. The boot sequence is a thing of beauty and falsely puts the user in expectation of the same after boot. Some of their themes are almost nice, some are unique, others are quite strange, while one is downright offensive. Themes and wallpapers can be changed, so while eyecandy can make a distro, it can rarely break one.

To quote the the site,

"The GoblinX Premium 2006.1 is the special edition created to be the main operating system of the goblin fan, our O.S. Replacement.
This edition is indicated to the goblin around the world who wishes to use the distro as his installed system because it contains a very large source of applications and features, like a devel center where you can find all programs needed to compile applications and drivers.

The Premium Edition contains languages, libraries, files and applications used to compile other programs from source code, contains several more applications to everyday use and more games for your entertainment, also contains more drivers and packages needed to improve hardware support, like sane, gimp-print, hpjis, ndiswrapper, slmodem and more."

LiveCD

The boot process in silent mode is nicely decorated with a strange scifi-ish background in shades of green. Being quite abstract, I can't tell what it's really supposed to be. It almost looks like a couple of weird spaceships colliding or perhaps a coupla aliens butting heads. In any case, it's an attractive and intriguing beginning. The verbose background is customized as well featuring screenshots of Goblinx on the left and your text scrolling a bit off-center in Matrix green. A pleasant experience is had in either case.

        

One is given many options to customize their booting process to match their system. One such option is "toram." By loading the system into ram, the performance increases quite noticeably, although one doesn't seem to be able to install to harddrive under this type of boot. Some of the other many options include usmap, alsa, nofirewall, usedhcp, nopcmcia, and many many others.

        

If one has an nvidia card, the livecd includes nvidia's own drivers and if the system is run from the livecd they are used. If one boots toram, then they are not, and are not available. Although conversely, if booted toram, the system detected both my monitors. Compared to livecd which used nvidia drivers and only detected one. Weird.

The System

Goblinx comes with several desktop managers and each is uniquely different from the next. From the menus one can choose from a plethora of available applications. They include many favorite apps to accomplish about any task. This is true through the whole of Goblinx. All the desktop environments tested seemed extremely stable as well as the applications. Multimedia is hit and miss, as are their plugins. The biggest draw is probably their games. Goblinx comes with a long list of 2D and 3D games and many are contained within one application they call their Games Center. Some of the games would not open for me and some would open from the menu but not the Game Center.

        

KDE is probably the most unique desktop environment included with Goblinx. Using a superkaramba theme to skin a customized toolbar/launcher, this desktop is anything but boring. In shades of pumpkin, yellow, black and off-red, it's the strangest toolbar I've ever seen. Strange in a cool though. Double clicking the big red K icon will slide the customized KDE menu onto your desktop. The windec is also uniquely Goblinx, utilizing what appears to be a customized keramik in shades of yellow-orange and dark gray/black.

        

E16 is another desktop available in Goblinx. Again featuring Halloween colors, it fits in with the Goblinx look and feel while offering a bit of continuity. The menu was approximately the same in all the window managers except in this case featuring familiar e16 entries as well. Also available are two other themes, winter and one of almost solid black. It appears no wallpaper was utilized, instead opting for a solid black background. This is still preferable to the wallpaper found in Fluxbox.

        

Fluxbox would be a nicely customized job if not for the shock received from its wallpaper. This desktop is again using the same Goblinx colors and icons, and has a nice row of customized icons for some popular application running along the bottom of screen just above the black and orange panel. These icons launch gimp, firefox, xedit, aterm, xmms, and gaim. The windec is primarily an understated dark gray or black with gray buttons. This could all work if not for the default wallpaper. One is shocked by the appearance of a nude woman in an blending of a skyscape and some transparent abstract shapes. Although the most of her is a bit out-of-focus, one breast is highlighted and thrust right in your face. It effectively becomes the uncomfortable focal point quite inappropriate for a desktop to be used in a professional or even a family situation. I found this to be a quite immature move on the part of Goblinx developers. Fortunately, in the menu is a link to a background changing script.

        

The default desktop environment for Goblinx is the impeccable Xfce4. Again, using the background as a foundation, xfce4 is another unique, but satisfying experience in Goblinx. The default background is another strange image of what could be some type of space ship or machinery with a control panel or monitor as the focal point. It main color usage is in the hue of blue, yet features contrasting reds. I like this artwork even if it don't match the pumpkin colors of the window frames, icons, and other features. The launcher has shortcuts using the icons as described above in fluxbox as well as launching the same applications. The menu is highly customized to contain all the available applications, Goblinx's own module scripts, and a link to the harddrive installer.

        

Harddrive Install

I must have tried to install Goblinx 4 times before I finally got it to install. On at least two occasions, the installer would take me through the routine and I'd end up with empty directories. The third time I thought to check them before rebooting and it appeared as though everything had been copied, yet upon reboot it was gone. I finally got an install after umounting and remounting the target directory a few times. I suspect the installer was installing to ramdisk. But how or why was it doing that? I could copy jpeg images to another mounted partition, so why couldn't the installer copy to one? It obviously hit the right one to make the directories. But in-between, it loads all the needed modules, (supposedly) copies configuration files and asks about lilo. The installer itself was a very simple process in that it only asks two questions, on which partition to install and if it should install lilo. If they ever perfect the process, it could be considered very newbie-friendly.

        

Even after I got a hard drive install, things didn't procede as expected. The main problems are that / is still mounted as tmpfs, many configurations are overwritten each boot, and the root directory is deleted each boot. It didn't seem to copy the root directory from the cd or for some reason it was deleted. As such all their nice little themes and artwork configurations was virtually gone. Firefox was default as were all the window managers. Some desktops couldn't even start because there wasn't a root directory. So even if one makes a root directory, gets into the window managers, and sets up all their preferences again; it's lost next boot. I had to setup X again each boot as well as my network. The dhcpcd that worked for the livecd didn't work so well on the hard drive install. Even with the edit of the inet1a.conf file for dhcpcd, it just didn't work. Setting up a regular user account isn't much use either as first they aren't asked for their password upon login, they aren't allow to su to root, and can't start X. In addition, Goblinx ejects both my cd drives at each and every shutdown. We'll forego the discussion on the package management as it's moot at this point.

        

Conclusion

So, all in all, I'd say this one needs to simmer a bit more. I liked the Goblin mini-cd when tested a while back, but the hard drive installer was broken then and it's still broke now. In fact, I think it's more frustrating to get a broken system than none at all. Despite X and application stability, many of the games were inoperative.

The mini-cd or even the premium cd would be useful if you wanted a livecd to use or carry around to show the differing possibilities of Linux. It's definitely not your run-of-the-mill Linux. But if you are wanting to install a system in which to make yourself at home, Goblinx isn't quite ready yet.

More Screenshots.

THX... I'm probably GUILT...

Hi, thanks Susan for the review...
I've decided to create a login for me here, now I can participate more on Tuxmachines... I've just did another install test and I found some erros, too... I've sent already another install script to the FTP... but I found different erros...
I could not play 3D games after installation, but I play every game without problem while using the livecd... something is wrong with nvidia drivers after install... I'll try to figure out where is the error...

BTW, goblins and fans loved the Fluxbox wallpaper, is not a nude, it's an artistic representation of a beautifull (nude) sculpture.

k=°]

Re: Don't rush, think architecture first ?

atang1 wrote:
Many distros do hdd install first then livecd iso. So, hdd install would work smoothly.
Livecd would be a mirror image of hdd install;

Hi, but GoblinX is not like that, and does not have much bugs, we found some bugs like every other distro and they are reported to the homepage... GoblinX uses a modular system (linux live), so all modules are separeted by type, like a module for games, another for kde... like Slax... It's not built over an installed system because works better this way and modular system is far better than other system because user can control every little thing on the livecd(ISO).
There is only a bug we found very bad, Nvidia drivers is not working after install, but anyone can install the driver later, and there are more small and very easy to correct bugs.

Hi

The install script is very simple, I added it because several users asked me about how to install, Slax has problems also with its install, but I can install here. The install script load all modules direct to the harddisk partition, then save default settings, root settings, install bootsplash and if you don't have, can install lilo, too.

About the modular system on GoblinX, all modules are built for type, but we have one basic module called base.mo which contains the minimum system, like libraries, for example, libjpeg, libpng, libogg, applications like coreutils, cdrecord, bash, and the scripts also are into base.mo. All GoblinX versions need this base.mo and also kernel.mo, other modules you don't need to use, of course if you wish to run KDE, you need also the X server module (defX.mo). All Kde games like kwin4, kpat, kreversi are in Kde module not in games module, because they need KDE to run, all Kde apps are in kde.mo, so you don't need to use games.mo if you don't want to. All packages are compiled as package, with all dependencies tested. GoblinX Mini has deflibs.mo and default.mo, those are modules for GTK apps, so I've just removed kde.mo, goblix.mo and games.mo from GoblinX and BAM!!! a new livecd is born. Goblix.mo has more apps and other windows managers, like Fluxbox.

About Nvidia, I could figure out the problem, the X server is starting glx from xorg (libglx.a) instead of use libglx from Nvidia, so the user most remove /usr/X11R6/lib/modules/extensions/{libglx.a,libGLcore.a} to get glx to work with Nvidia.

I'll add this solutions to our homepage.

BTW, I never tested to run ISO from hd but some users did.

modular system

Thanks for explaining how you have organized the modules in GoblinX. It gave me some ideas, I need to do something about my module system in Wolvix. It's a reall mess now, since I've dropped using single modules for each package. I had so many modules in Media Edition it slowed the system down.
I've grouped my modules now, but I can't use them as building blocks as you do in GoblinX, I've got dependencies spread around in the different modules, no system or structure at all. =)

It's not that hard

It's not that hard the way we use modules on GoblinX... Add a basic module, in this base module you must include necessary apps and libraries, for example, libjpeg, you will have at least one application to open jpeg files, so it's a necessary library, but libbonobo, you need only to run Gnome/GTK apps, Kde does not need it, so you can include libbonobo into another module... Modular System is great, everyday another distro is born using the system.

what's offensive?

I am far more offended by a broken installer than by a nude picture. Nudity is a part of life and that's fine by me, while broken installers... well, actually, they are a part of life too, unfortunately. But unlike nudity, they shouldn't be Smile

Re: what's offensive?

ferrix wrote:

I am far more offended by a broken installer than by a nude picture. Nudity is a part of life and that's fine by me, while broken installers... well, actually, they are a part of life too, unfortunately. But unlike nudity, they shouldn't be Smile

Men! <shakes head> Big Grin

it's like an artistic nude...

It's not the first comment about Fluxbox wallpaper I read, Chris from Osdir.com don't include screenshots of it... k=°]
I'll ask my users like I did before about not include it as default background, but in a past poll at our forum people liked more that wallpaper... In the case of GoblinX is more easy correct the installer than the wallpaper... but to change the wallpaper you need to save your settings to a file called confsave.tgz, in the next boot it is going to be restored.

Old Poll:
Xfce Wallpaper [Tracing_1] - 11%
Fluxbox Wallpaper [Nude_18a] - 55%
WMaker Wallpaper [Anubic_] - 22%
Enlight Wallpaper [Art_1] - 11%

Re: it's like an artistic nude...

Grobsch wrote:

It's not the first comment about Fluxbox wallpaper I read, Chris from Osdir.com don't include screenshots of it... k=°]

I blurry'd it out. Tongue

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

OSS Leftovers

  • The Serverless Show: The Importance of Open Source & Community Involvement
    “I’m also involved with some open source projects. I started with Node community and helping out with some node libraries a long time ago. Now I’m mostly doing serverless-related things. I joined the Claudia.js team a long time ago, almost at the beginning, and helped Gojko Adzic and Alexander Simovich to build Claudia.js. Claudia was and still is a deployment library for AWS Lambda and API gateway. At the beginning, it was really hard to deploy serverless applications. If you tried to do that manually, you need to zip everything, to set the permissions, and things like that. The idea of Claudia was to extend AWS CLI tools and to help users deploy serverless applications easier. We continued doing Claudia and a few other things. We contributed a bit to AWS SAM and we built some other applications that are open source. We’re trying to build tools that we need and that the serverless community needs.”
  • Expect to Hear More About Open Source’s Role in Security [Ed: Security implemented with proprietary software is almost always fake. The Australian back doors ("encryption") bill is a reminder of it. If something is proprietary, one must assume back doors (even mandated from above, hidden in binaries)]
    Will 2019 be the year there is a big push for consolidation between open source and cybersecurity? Yes, said Sanjay Beri, CEO of Netskope, in an email comment. IBM’s acquisition of Red Hat could prove to be the game changer in how organizations approach security.
  • Want to Save Some Money? Check out These Free Software Alternatives
    The list covers drawing and design, animation and film, website building, and others. For example, Ghost Malone presents several free alternatives to drawing, design and post-processing, such as GIMP, Krita, Fire Alpaca, Autodesk Sketchbook, MediBang Paint, and Paint.NET. Another example, for editing vector graphics, is Inkscape, which is free and open source. The list goes on with several choices depending on what you're looking for.
  • A free and open source Bitcoin trading tool has been developed by two students
    University students Jonathan Shobrook and Aaron Lichtman have created a free and open source automated trading bot to use on the Bitstamp exchange.
  • Thank Stanford researchers for Puffer, a free and open source live TV streaming service that uses AI to improve video-streaming algorithms
  • Open Source To Open Newer Avenues For CIOs In 2019
    Open source plays a crucial role in all the top strategic technology trends that are reshaping the IT world. Rajarshi Bhattacharyya, Country Head, SUSE, looks at the key trends for 2019 that organizations need to explore and in explains how open source technologies and practices open up a window of opportunities for the CIOs in the coming days.
  • The High Profile Team of Handshake Looks to Truly Open the Internet with a New Domain Name System
    Unlike other major blockchain based companies like Ethereum, they chose to avoid ICO funding altogether and went straight for private investors. They were able to obtain major private investment funding from companies such as Polychain Capital, A16Z Crypto, and Founders Fund (purchasing 7.5% coin supply of HNS between them at $10.2M) with the idea that they could be responsible for replacing entire layers of Domain Name System (DNS) layering. This removes the need for those who safeguard these layers, saving future companies large amounts of cash up front.
  • Handshake is attempting to make the Internet more open
    Handshake came out of stealth mode last August. The project, which intends to replace various levels of the Domain Name System (DNS) hierarchy, was founded by Joseph Poon (co-creator of the Lightning Network & Plasma), Andrew Lee (co-founder & CEO of Purse), Andrew Lee (co-founder & CEO of Private Internet Access), Boyma Fahnbulleh (Bcoin developer), and Christopher Jeffery (Creator of Bcoin & CTO of Purse). Sidestepping the ICO route popularized by Ethereum, Handshake raised private funding from a slew of investors including A16Z Crypto, Polychain Capital, and Founders Fund. These investors purchased 7.5% of the initial coin supply of HNS, Handshake’s native token, for $10.2M, valuing the protocol at $136M.
  • Google remains the top open-source contributor to CNCF projects
    According to the latest data from Stackalytics, a project founded by Mirantis and hosted by the OpenStack Foundation that visualizes a company’s contribution to open-source projects, Google remains the dominant force in the CNCF open-source ecosystem. Indeed, according to this data, Google is responsible for almost 53 percent of all code commits to CNCF projects. Red Hat, the second biggest contributor, is far behind, with 7.4 percent. The CNCF is the home of Kubernetes, the extremely popular container orchestration service that Google open sourced, so the fact that Google is the top contributor may not seem like a major surprise. But according to this data, Google would still be the top code contributor to all CNCF projects without even taking Kubernetes into account. In part, that’s due to the fact that Google is also the major contributor to GRPC, a queuing project the company donated to the CNCF, and Vitess, the database clustering system it developed for YouTube.
  • Google Remains Top Open-Source Contributor
    According to a scan of code contributions to projects sponsored by the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF), Google (NASDAQ: GOOGL) remains by far the largest contributor of code across all projects. Using a tool called Stackalytics, the survey conducted by open-source infrastructure vendor Mirantis found that Google accounted for 52.9 percent of code commits to CNCF projects.
  • Johnson Controls to Introduce Open-Source Software for Targeting Retrofits

Server Side Public License (SSPL), Red Hat and Fedora

  • Red Hat/Fedora decide MongoDB’s SSLP doesn’t fit
    MongoDB’s January blues deepened this week as the team behind the Red Hat-backed Fedora Linux distribution confirmed it had added the open source database’s Server Side Public License to its “bad”list. The move came as it emerged Red Hat – Fedora’s sponsor – had nixed MongoDB support in RHEL 8.0.
  • AWS Raised Its Hand Lest Of Open Source Platform
    Even though AWS stands by MongoDB as the best the customers find it difficult to build and vastly accessible applications on the open-source platform can range from multiple terabytes to hundreds of thousands of reads and writes per second. Thus, the company built its own document database with an Apache 2.0 open source MongoDB 3.6 API compatibility. The open-sources politics are quite difficult to grasp. AWS has been blamed for taking the top open-source projects and re-branding plus re-using it without providing the communities. The catch here is that MongoDB was the company behind putting a halt to the re-licensing of the open-source tools under a novel license that clearly stated the companies willing to do this will have to purchase a commercial license.
  • Red Hat gets heebie-jeebies over MongoDB's T&Cs squeeze: NoSQL database dropped from RHEL 8B over license
    MongoDB justified its decision last October to shift the free version of its NoSQL database software, MongoDB Community Server, from the open-source GNU Affero General Public License to the not-quite-so-open Server Side Public License (SSPL) by arguing that cloud providers sell open-source software as a service without giving back. The following month, and not widely noticed until this week, Red Hat said it would no longer include MongoDB in version 8 of Red Hat Enterprise Linux. The removal notice came in the release notes for Red Hat Enterprise Linux Beta 8.0. Under section 4.7, the release notes say, "Note that the NoSQL MongoDB database server is not included in RHEL 8.0 Beta because it uses the Server Side Public License (SSPL)."
  • Server Side Public License struggles to gain open-source support
    MongoDB first announced the release of the new software license in October as a way to protect itself and other open-source projects like it from being taken advantage of by larger companies for monetary gain. At the time, MongoDB co-founder and CTO Eliot Horowitz explained: “This should be a time of incredible opportunity for open source. The revenue generated by a service can be a great source of funding for open-source projects, far greater than what has historically been available. The reality, however, is that once an open-source project becomes interesting, it is too easy for large cloud vendors to capture most of the value while contributing little or nothing back to the community.” Other open-source businesses have developed their own licenses or adopted others in recent months, citing the same issues. However, the problem with these new licenses is that if they are not approved by the Open Source Initiative (OSI), an organization created to promote and protect the open-source ecosystem, the software behind the license is technically not considered open source, and it will have a hard time getting acceptance from members in the community.
  • Open source has a problem with monetization, not AWS
  • Why you should take notice of the open source in enterprise suckers conundrum
    In the MongoDB case, AWS is widely regarded as responding to a licensing change MongoDB made in October 2018 that has caused something of a stir among the open source cognoscenti.
  • Fedora Community Blog: FPgM report: 2019-03
    Here’s your report of what has happened in Fedora Program Management this week. I’ve set up weekly office hours in #fedora-meeting-1. Drop by if you have any questions or comments about the schedule, Changes, elections, or anything else.

How to Integrate Dropbox in Ubuntu Using Nautilus File Manager

This beginners guide will help you to install and integrate Dropbox in Ubuntu’s Nautilus file manager. Dropbox is a popular file hosting service provides users cloud storage and access to your files from any device. Dropbox provides free account upto a certain storage limit and also provides subscription based accounts. Dropbox provides native desktop apps for Linux systems. Read more

Security: Cincoze Back Doors (ME), Windows 10 Mobile Killed (No More Patches), New FUD About 'Linux Servers'

  • Industrial Apollo Lake mini-PC features dual GbE with PoE
    Cincoze announced a compact, rugged “DA-1100” embedded PC with an Apollo Lake SoC, triple display support, dual GbE ports with PoE, 4x USB 3.0 ports, SATA, and expansion via mini-PCIe and homegrown add-on modules. Cincoze has updated its “entry level” Intel Bay Trail based DA-1000 industrial mini-PC, which is sold under the same name in the U.S. by Logic Supply. The new Apollo Lake based DA-1100, which is now referred to as an edge computer is not only a bit faster, but offers a few key enhancements, including PoE and triple displays. No pricing was listed by Taiwan-based Cincoze, but Logic Supply sold the earlier DA-1000 at $569 and up including a 32GB SATA SSD. It’s possible the new model will end up at Logic Supply as well.
  • Microsoft is Ending Windows 10 Mobile Support on December 10th, 2019
    After the end of support, Windows Phones will continue to work, but some features will eventually shut down. Automatic and manual backups for settings and apps will cease after March 10, 2020. And services like photo upload and device restore will stop December 2020.
  • Linux-Targeting Cryptojacking Malware Disables Cloud-Based Security Measures: Report [Ed: They make it sound like GNU/Linux is the problem; but it relies on already-compromised GNU/Linux systems]
    A new cryptojacking malware has the ability to disable cloud-based security measures to avoid detection on Linux servers, research by information security company Palo Alto Networks Jan. 17 reveals. The malware in question mines Monero (XMR) and is reportedly a modified version of one used by the so-called “Rocke” group, originally discovered by cybersecurity firm Talos in August last year. According to the research, one of the first things that the malware does is check for other cryptocurrency mining processes and add firewall rules to block any other cryptojacking malware.