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Ubuntu: LibreOffice Replacing Reports Premature

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It looks as if some folks got a little bit carried away with the news yesterday that the next version of Ubuntu, 11.04, will feature LibreOffice instead of

Because, actually, that's not exactly what's happening. Yet.

On Monday, Linux Magazine's Amber Graner got it right, when she reported that Ubuntu Desktop Engineer Matthias Klose announced that "LibreOffice would be included in the Alpha 2 Natty Narwhal release for evaluation and possible inclusion into the final Ubuntu 11.04 release."

Somehow, by the next day, the news was mistakenly distorted to headlines in more than a few outlets that stated "LibreOffice Replaces OpenOffice In Natty.

rest here

LibreOffice Replaces OpenOffice

Premature Ubuntulation?

Poodles, where's the like button?


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