Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Novell: Will Some Executives Exit March 9?

Filed under

Let’s assume Attachmate finalizes the Novell acquisition on March 9, 2011. According to an SEC filing, Certain Novell executives could earn $1.38 million to $6.85 million in lump sum cash payments if their positions are terminated on that date. So which Novell executives are staying and which ones may leave with a hefty bounty? The VAR Guy doesn’t know for sure. But here’s a look at potential severance packages, including potential cash payouts for Novell’s CEO and Novell’s channel chief.

A December 2010 SEC filing from Novell states:

Each of our executive officers (consisting of Ronald W. Hovsepian, our President and Chief Executive Officer, Dana C. Russell, our Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer, John K. Dragoon, our Senior Vice President and Chief Marketing Officer, Joseph H. Wagner, our Senior Vice President and General Manager, Global Alliances, Russell C. Poole, our Senior Vice President, Human Resources, Scott N. Semel, our Senior Vice President, General Counsel and Secretary, James P. Ebzery, our Senior Vice President and General Manager, Security, Management and Operating Platforms, Colleen A. O’Keefe, our Senior Vice President and General Manager, Collaboration Solutions and Global Services and Javier F. Colado, our Senior Vice President, Worldwide Sales), is eligible for severance benefits under severance agreements with us.

The list above includes executives with extensive channel experience — such as Senior VP and Chief Marketing Officer John Dragoon, who serves as the company’s current channel chief; and Senior VP of Worldwide Sales Javier Colado, who previously served as channel chief.

rest here

Also: Over the last few months, I've frequently pointed out the vulnerability of important open source projects that are supported and controlled by corporate sponsors, rather than hosted by independent foundations funded by corporate sponsors. One of the examples I've given is SUSE Linux, which has been hosted and primarily supported by Novell since that company acquired SuSE Linux AG in 2003. Novell, as you know, is expected to be acquired by a company called Attachmate a few weeks from now, assuming approval of the transaction by the Novell stockholders and by German competition regulators.

Recently, the future of the SUSE Linux Project (as compared to the Novell commercial Linux distribution based on the work of that project) has become rather murky, as reported by Pamela Jones, at Groklaw. Apparently, Novell is facilitating some sort of spin out of the Project, which is good but peculiar news.

Rest of Attachmate and the SUSE Linux Project: What's Next?

More in Tux Machines

Intel Cache Allocation Technology / RDT Still Baking For Linux

Not mentioned in my earlier features you won't find in the Linux 4.9 mainline kernel is support for Intel's Cache Allocation Technology (CAT) but at least it was revised this weekend in still working towards mainline integration. Read more Also: Intel Sandy Bridge Graphics Haven't Gotten Faster In Recent Years

Distributing encryption software may break the law

Developers, distributors, and users of Free and Open Source Software (FOSS) often face a host of legal issues which they need to keep in mind. Although areas of law such as copyright, trademark, and patents are frequently discussed, these are not the only legal concerns for FOSS. One area that often escapes notice is export controls. It may come as a surprise that sharing software that performs or uses cryptographic functions on a public website could be a violation of U.S. export control law. Export controls is a term for the various legal rules which together have the effect of placing restrictions, conditions, or even wholesale prohibitions on certain types of export as a means to promote national security interests and foreign policy objectives. Export control has a long history in the United States that goes back to the Revolutionary War with an embargo of trade with Great Britain by the First Continental Congress. The modern United States export control regime includes the Department of State's regulations covering export of munitions, the Treasury Department's enforcement of United States' foreign embargoes and sanctions regimes, and the Department of Commerce's regulations applying to exports of "dual-use" items, i.e. items which have civil applications as well as terrorism, military, or weapons of mass destruction-related applications. Read more

Linux Kernel News

Games for GNU/Linux