Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Novell: Will Some Executives Exit March 9?

Filed under
SUSE

Let’s assume Attachmate finalizes the Novell acquisition on March 9, 2011. According to an SEC filing, Certain Novell executives could earn $1.38 million to $6.85 million in lump sum cash payments if their positions are terminated on that date. So which Novell executives are staying and which ones may leave with a hefty bounty? The VAR Guy doesn’t know for sure. But here’s a look at potential severance packages, including potential cash payouts for Novell’s CEO and Novell’s channel chief.

A December 2010 SEC filing from Novell states:

Each of our executive officers (consisting of Ronald W. Hovsepian, our President and Chief Executive Officer, Dana C. Russell, our Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer, John K. Dragoon, our Senior Vice President and Chief Marketing Officer, Joseph H. Wagner, our Senior Vice President and General Manager, Global Alliances, Russell C. Poole, our Senior Vice President, Human Resources, Scott N. Semel, our Senior Vice President, General Counsel and Secretary, James P. Ebzery, our Senior Vice President and General Manager, Security, Management and Operating Platforms, Colleen A. O’Keefe, our Senior Vice President and General Manager, Collaboration Solutions and Global Services and Javier F. Colado, our Senior Vice President, Worldwide Sales), is eligible for severance benefits under severance agreements with us.

The list above includes executives with extensive channel experience — such as Senior VP and Chief Marketing Officer John Dragoon, who serves as the company’s current channel chief; and Senior VP of Worldwide Sales Javier Colado, who previously served as channel chief.

rest here


Also: Over the last few months, I've frequently pointed out the vulnerability of important open source projects that are supported and controlled by corporate sponsors, rather than hosted by independent foundations funded by corporate sponsors. One of the examples I've given is SUSE Linux, which has been hosted and primarily supported by Novell since that company acquired SuSE Linux AG in 2003. Novell, as you know, is expected to be acquired by a company called Attachmate a few weeks from now, assuming approval of the transaction by the Novell stockholders and by German competition regulators.

Recently, the future of the SUSE Linux Project (as compared to the Novell commercial Linux distribution based on the work of that project) has become rather murky, as reported by Pamela Jones, at Groklaw. Apparently, Novell is facilitating some sort of spin out of the Project, which is good but peculiar news.

Rest of Attachmate and the SUSE Linux Project: What's Next?




More in Tux Machines

Control Or Consensus?

In a recent conversation on the Apache Legal mailing list, a participant opined that “any license can be Open Source. OSI doesn’t ‘own’ the term.” He went on to explain “I could clone the Apache License and call it ‘Greg’s License’ and it would be an open source license.” As long as the only people involved in the conversation are the speaker and people who defer to his authority, this might be OK. But as soon as there are others involved, it’s not. For the vast majority of people, the term “open source license” is not a personal conclusion resulting from considered evaluation, but rather a term of art applied to the consensus of the community. Individuals are obviously free to use words however they wish, just like Humpty Dumpty. But the power of the open source movement over two decades has arisen from a different approach. The world before open source left every developer to make their own decision about whether software was under a license that delivers the liberty to use, improve and share code without seeking the permission of a rights holder. Inevitably that meant either uncertainty or seeking advice from a lawyer about the presence of software freedom. The introduction of the open source concept around the turn of the millennium solved that using the crystalisation of consensus to empower developers. By holding a public discussion of each license around the Open Source Definition, a consensus emerged that could then by crystalised by the OSI Board. Once crystalised into “OSI Approval”, the community then has no need to revisit the discussion and the individual developer has no need to guess (or to buy advice) on the compatibility of a given license with software freedom. That in turn means proceeding with innovation or deployment without delay. Read more

How To Install Sublime Text 3 Stable In Linux

All the developers out there love Sublime Text. It has been emerging as a great text editor for learners and advanced. It is available on Linux, Mac OS and Windows. Sublime text offers features like macros, recognition of a wide variety of languages, split view etc. The editor can also be customized using different themes. Some of these themes are already popular through Notepad++. Read
more

How to create an e-book chapter template in LibreOffice Writer

For many people, using a word processor is the fastest, easiest, and most familiar way to write and publish an e-book. But firing up your word processor and typing away isn't enough—you need to follow a format. That's where a template comes in. A template ensures that your book has a consistent look and feel. Luckily, creating a template is quick and easy, and the time and effort you spend on it will give you a better-looking book. In this article, I'll walk you through how to create a simple template for writing individual chapters of an e-book using LibreOffice Writer. You can use this template for both PDF and EPUB books and modify it to suit your needs. Read more

So the 'Year of Linux' never happened. When is it Chrome OS's turn?

The year of Linux desktop was a running joke. The concept of Linux being ready for the mainstream with users confidently running it on their desktops, sadly, never happened. Some bravely pushed the idea: the latest being Canonical with a more macOS-like desktop, easier to configure and use than the standard Linux distro. It came with an app-store concept too. Read more