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One More Look at Pinguy - on Netbooks This Time

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Linux

I've had ten days or so to look at Pinguy now, so I want to write a sort of "wrap-up" for my own purposes at this time. I will not be using it as the default or preferred distribution on any of my systems, because there are a few too many things about it that I don't care for. The biggest of those is the fact that it is heavily dependent on Mono, for the "docky" package and a few others. By the time I extract mono and the packages that depend on it, I'm left with something that is certainly no better than Linux Mint, PCLinuxOS or SimplyMEPIS. That is not to say that it isn't a very good and very interesting distribution, and those who do not have moral or philosophical objections to Mono could very well find it extremely attractive. However, another area where I think it falls short is netbook support, so that is what I will examine here.

I have loaded Pinguy on three of my netbooks - the Samsung N150 Plus, the Lenovo S10-3s, and my trusty HP 2133 Mini-Note. That last one turned out to be quite a struggle, but I finally got it.

rest here




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