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Gentoo Linux sucks

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When I first installed Gentoo, I thought it was pretty good. It was not as easy as other distros (such as Ubuntu), but it gave me lots of control on how I wanted the system configured and set up and I really liked that. I liked it so much that I was considering using it for my main development workstation here at home.

At work, we have an old mail server set up on Gentoo. For some reason, another tech here rebooted it. It would not come back up. This happened in the middle of the afternoon, which is not the best time for things like this to happen. So I connected to it with a Remote KVM (Keyboard, Video, Mouse) device and saw that it had failed to boot up. It was sitting there at the console with a message like this:

rest here

People who don't know how to use Gentoo suck

I am doubtful that an update was pushed through that could ruin the boot. It sounds more like someone was fiddling around with it and ended up breaking the system. I've been using Gentoo full-time for six years and have never had an update kill my machine like that.

Just because a problem arises within an OS doesn't mean it sucks, especially if you don't fully understand what caused the problem to begin with.


Deathspawner wrote:
Just because a problem arises within an OS doesn't mean it sucks, especially if you don't fully understand what caused the problem to begin with.

Ironically this describes 99.999999999% of all Linux fanboys describing some phantom Windows problem.

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