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Choose Your Distro according to the Zodiac! (PART I)

Filed under
Linux
Humor

Some people try Linux and experience frustration because they just pick any distribution, mainly that one with releases named after African fauna, without any kind of previous consultation.

Who are they supposed to consult with anyway?

The answer is simple...consult with the stars! Use the zodiac to choose the distro that best fits your sign!

Oh...but there's a problem: zodiac signs have moved a month already, so we need to update our horoscopes first!

Unfortunately, updating the horoscope won't be as simple as opening a terminal and running a few commands or doing it through a GUI like Synaptic. An individual will take much longer to accept, for example, that if he or she was born on July 24, his/her current sign is not Leo but Cancer. Running "apt-get upgrade" won't help this time.

In this light, here's a chart of the updated zodiac signs with a list of Linux distributions (mostly...there's also BSD) matching them for us to check if our Distro fits our sign.

rest here




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