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Should you move to Arch Linux?

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Linux

Suppose that you have been using GNU/Linux for a number of months now. You had previously been using Windows or Mac OS X, but heard about the freedom, openness, and performance inherent to open source operating systems. So you decided to install this “Linux” thing and worked through whatever bugs or trouble you may have encountered. That was it, you were sold!

If you are that GNU/Linux user who has become comfortable working with the command line, and desires to really get to know the ins and outs of your system then this article and Arch Linux are for you. Arch Linux is more than a GNU/Linux distribution; it is a philosophy. This philosophy is embodied in what is called the Arch Way: Simple, Elegant, Versatile, and Expedient (Arch Way V2). Take caution, don’t be fooled into thinking that simple and elegant means that anyone can pick up Arch Linux and use it right away. When an Arch Linux user says simple, they don’t mean simple for the end user, they mean simple for the developer.

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Yes, move to Arch Linux

Do it NOW! Angry

Racists on the Arch Linux Mailing List

I joined the Arch Linux public general mailing list and posted a free opensource FOSS font for coders to use, Rail Model font. I was accused of spamming and trolling by certain developers there. These were just excuses from them as underneath they had a racist attitude to my email address for the mailing list:
hare_krsna_hare_krsna_krsna_krsna_hare_hare_hare_rama_hare_rama_rama_rama_hare_hare -at- .....

Thus when I tried to defend against their accusations I was banned from there, no discussion nothing.

Suggestion

What you describe isn't by definition racism. A google search on your claimed e-mail address gives anyone who so wishes possibility to read the mail exchange.

Spamming and trolling is a problem for public projects, and hence good manners would be to avoid anything that possibly could be understood as such. There's an easy solution to this problem: for work related contacts use a simple e-mail address. Your freedom to express believes, when appropriate, should encourage you to foremost think of other's interests. To force others to accept personal decisions, is to limit the freedom of others.

Furthermore this isn't the proper way to deal with a personal conflict. This isn't a solution, and can only reach as far as becoming an attempt for revenge. If you wish to find a solution you're free to contact project leaders directly.

...

Now I'm confused: are you trying to prove that you don't spam by spamming tuxmachines.org? You've posted this at least on two places here.

Racists on the Arch Linux Mailing List: The facts are.....

In response to "Submitted by KimTjik on Wed, 01/26/2011 - 10:28."

I answered someone else on another website and I am pasting that response here. Regarding my posting also under another Arch Linux reference on this website: this was for letting those who read the other reference perhaps not this one. Please be reasonable, this copying the same response does not constitute spam/troll and I did it for practical purposes.

The facts are:

1. -ignoring- is not the correct word to describe. I requested for help as I am not a techie.

2. -prod and probe forum members- is not correct phrase either. They were some on that Arch Linux mailing list who just could not accept my email address, hare_krsna_hare_krsna_krsna_krsna_hare_hare_hare_rama_hare_rama_rama_rama_hare_hare -at- ..... and just used racist weasel words and phrases, hounding me on and on relentlessly.

3. -etiquette- was used by me without any foul language. Some on that list were using racist weasel words and because I have been a victim before several times I could tell, it was not new to me.

4. -stomp- is not what I did, it was a general public mailing list and I posted an on-topic subject. I had posted the same press release on other public mailing lists and I never came across what I faced at the Arch Linux public mailing list.

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