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LibreOffice 3.3 Release Candidate 4 available

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LibO

The Document Foundation is happy to announce the fourth release candidate of LibreOffice 3.3. This release candidate is not intended for production use! The final release of LibreOffice 3.3, for production use, will be available soon.

The Release Candidate 4 is available for Windows, Linux and Mac OS X from our download page at

http://www.libreoffice.org/download

Should you find bugs, please report them to the FreeDesktop Bugzilla:

https://bugs.freedesktop.org

If you want to get involved with this exciting project, you can
contribute code:

https://www.libreoffice.org/get-involved/developers/

translate LibreOffice to your language:

http://wiki.documentfoundation.org/Translation_for_3_3

or just donate:

http://www.documentfoundation.org/contribution/

A list of known issues with RC4 is available from our wiki:

http://wiki.documentfoundation.org/Releases/3.3/RC4

Finally, let us express a BIG Thank You! to the following 162
individuals who have contributed to the LibreOffice source code and
translations repository between Beta 3 and RC4:

Abduqadir Sahran
Adrià Cereto Massagué
Alan Du
Alexey Doroshenko
Andras Timar
Andreas Mantke
Andre Fischer
Andre Schnabel
Andrew C. E. Dent
An Drouizig
Antón Méixome
Arjuna Rao Chavala
Arnaud Versini
A S Alam
Aurimas Fišeras
AWASHIRO Ikuya
Bernhard Rosenkraenzer
Bruno Gallart
camille
Caolán McNamara
Carles Ferrando Garcia
Cédric Bosdonnat
Cheng-Chia Tseng
Chris Halls
Christian Lippka
Christian Lohmaier
Christoph Noack
Cor Nouws
Daniel Rentz
David Tardon
Dean Lee
Denis Arnaud
Dirk Voelzke
Doroshenko Alexey
Dwayne Bailey
Eike Rathke
Florian Bircher
Florian Reuter
Fong Lin
Frank Schoenheit
Freek de Kruijf
Fridrich Strba
Fridrich Štrba
Gerald Geib
Gert Faller
Gheyret Tohti
Gil Forcada
Giuseppe Castagno
Goran Rakic
Graeme
Hanno Meyer-Thurow
Harri Pitkänen
Helen russian
Henning Brinkmann
Herbert Duerr
Hossein Noorikhah
Hristo Hristov
Iñaki Larrañaga Murgoitio
Ingo Schmidt
Israt Jahan
Ivo Hinkelmann
Jacek Wolszczak
Jan Holesovsky
Jani Monoses
Jens-Heiner Rechtien
Jeongkyu Kim
Jesse Adelman
Jesús Corrius
J. Graeme Lingard
Joachim Lingner
Joerg Skottke
John LeMoyne Castle
Jonas Finnemann Jensen
Joost Eekhoorn
Joseph Powers
Juergen Schmidt
Júlio Hoffimann
Kalman Kemenczy
Kalman Szalai - KAMI
Katarina Machalkova
Kayo Hamid
Keith Stribley
Kenneth Venken
Kevin Hunter
Kevin Scannell
Khoem Sokhem
Kohei Yoshida
Korvigelloù an Drouizig
krishnan parthasarathi
Kurt Zenker
Laszlo Nemeth
Laurent Charrière
Leif Lodahl
Lionel Elie Mamane
Lior Kaplan
Luboš Luňák
Luke Dixon
Luke Symes
Makoto Takizawa
Martin Gallwey
Martin Srebotnjak
Matthias Klose
Mattias Johnsson
Maxim Dziumanenko
Michael Meeks
Michael Stahl
Mihkel Tõnnov
Mikhail Voytenko
Miklos Vajna
Milos Sramek
Modestas Rimkus
Muthu Subramanian K
Nadav Vinik
Nigel Hawkins
Niklas Nebel
Niko Rönkkö
Noel Power
Norbert Thiebaud
Oliver Bolte
Ocke Janssen
Olav Dahlum
Oliver Craemer
Oliver-Rainer Wittmann
Olivier Hallot
Oliver Specht
Paolo Pozzan
Pau Iranzo
Per Eriksson
Petr Mladek
Philipp Lohmann
Povilas Kanapickas
Prashant Shah
Radek Doulik
Rene Engelhard
René Kjellerup
Rhoslyn Prys
Robert Nagy
Robert Sedak
Rubén Jáñez
Ruediger Timm
Santiago Bosio
Stephan Bergmann
Sean McMurray
Sebastian Spaeth
Sven Jacobi
Sophie Gautier
Stuart Swales
Sveinn í Felli
Takeshi Abe
Thomas Klausner
Thomas Lange
Thorsten Behrens
Thorsten Bosbach
Tim Retout
Tor Lillqvist
Trevor Murphy
Valter Mura
Wolfgang Silbermayr
Wols Lists
Xuacu Saturio
Yaron Shahrabani
Yifan J

Yours,

The Steering Committee of The Document Foundation




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