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DreamLinux 1.0 Studio Edition

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Linux
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Dreamlinux is a Brazilian distro based on Morphix and comes with the XFce4 desktop. Dreamlinux 1.0 Studio edition was released yesterday so we took it for a test drive today. Available in English and Portuguese, it defaults to English and offers one of the prettiest implementations of Xfce I've seen. How else does DreamLinux distinguish itself from Morphix or the others?

You might say it starts right after boot. The initial boot screen is Morphix and an almost carbon copy of several I've seen, but the silent boot splash is a nice original graphic with professional characteristics and a pretty yet understated logo. The verbose screen is a carry over from many distros as well featuring a large tux in the background.

        

After boot, things begin to look different. First thing one sees after system boot is a lovely xfce splash. Full screen dark blue background is highlighed by the DreamLinux logo with the progress messages shooting across the bottom of the screen in about 15 or 16 point bold white font. It's a great look. Then immediately one is treated to a flash animation more or less advertising DreamLinux. Bem-vindo, ao, Dreamlinux, and www.dreamlinux.com.br are the messages twisting in, fading in, racing out... That roughly translates to Welcome to the Dreamlinux. Smile Kinda cool. Then the desktop is shown. A great wallpaper of dark blues with again, a Dreamlinux STUDIOEdition logo in the corner, is the foundation for a wonderful looking xfce4. Customized icons and theme make dreamlinux a joy to use. The theme is called Milk-2-mod and the windec is Dream-milk, which in essense gives one a nice 3d windec with OS X like features. The windec buttons are blue and the pushbuttons and highlighted text are like the "aqua" button and effects with which we're familiar. The icons are of a gorgeous aqua like theme called DreamOS. Put it all together and we get a polished planned professional feel. It is really pretty. I can never find adequate words to describe these things. You need to just download and boot it.

        

The launcher has application menu buttons for audio, video and 3d as well as icons for mplayer, apt-get, xmms, filemanagers and xfce settings. Some applications included are Audacity, Avidemux, Blender, Gnomebaker, Firefox/Thunderbird, Nvu, Sound Juicer, Wings 3D, Jahshaka, Inkscape and mplayer, FONTpage. There's really just too much to list.

        

        

        

Also included are the Morphix Control Center for setting up most system configurations, a mkdistro application for remastering and making your own iso, and of course the impeccable Morphix harddrive installer.

        

My experience with Dream has been, well, a dream. It was fast, stable, fun, pretty, with no hassles. The only little glitch I found in my short excursion was the user file manager from the launcher was inoperative. It worked from the main menu and the root launcher worked. Speaking of root, since the site is in Brazillian or portuguese, I couldn't do too much research, and I could not "crack" the root password. As all commands I wanted to use worked with sudo, I'm thinking they may have went by way of Ubuntu and disabled root in favor of sudo. The distro sits on a 2.6.12 and includes its major drawback, XFree86 Version 4.3.0.1. It comes with some video, audio, and graphic examples for some of the many applications included. It's defining characteristic, what makes it different, is the wide range of multimedia applications and the sheer beauty by which it does it. Tuxmachines really liked Dreamlinux - we're such suckers for a pretty face! Big Grin

More Screenshots.

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