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Damn you Kubuntu

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Linux

I've been chugging along happily using Sabayon for about six months or so, but once again, the urge to update to the latest and greatest bit me on my asterisks.

I suffered this kind of defeat last time I moved to Sabayon for everyday. I'm kinda silly, but a have a deep down internal urge to run the newest software on my desktop. I can't help it. From cooker to unstable Gentoo and now to updated Sabayon, I just have to have the latest. This mostly has to do with KDE these days I think.

I was very disappointed with KDE 4 and begrudgingly moved to it and stopped bitching a little while back. But there are still things that bug me, so I keep hoping each release they are fixed or improved. So, I can't stop myself from upgrading.

Thus is the situation last week. But I think it goes deeper than KDE. But after last week's upgrade to KDE 4.5.5 and other system and software updates, the system slowed to a crawl and even periodically stopped responding. And it encompassed the hardware this time. I couldn't get a decent ISO burn, my nic would stop working after a few bytes, and the GUI stopped responding every few minutes. And if I fired up tvtime, ...f'getaboutit! I'd been having some trouble with too many Konqueror windows open in KDE 4 in general anyway, but after the update it just became unusable.

So, I tried to decide what to install and use for a little while. Well, Linux Mint 10 and LMDE offered no KDE versions for their latest releases. PCLOS has no 64-bit version. The last stable SimplyMepis is too outdated and 11 is still a while away. Debian requires too much work to get up to speed. openSUSE, the same deal hunting up codecs and browser plugins and such. Mandriva One only comes in 32 bit. Pardus has small repositories. So, I opted for Mandriva Free which is a bit easier in my mind to bring up to desktop speed (multimedia speaking). But nooo, my poor broke Sabayon couldn't burn a disk.

So, I'm looking around to see what is installed on my computer and I didn't really have too much to choose from. Everything on one hard drive is really old like Sabayon 4. The few on my main hard drive are getting old and a couple are broken. I have Mint 9, which for some reason didn't intrigue me - too old or something, I don't know. Mepis 8.5 I think, which I think I broke or was having an issue with, can't really remember. Oh no... then I saw Kubuntu 10.10, that I installed and ran to write a review on for distrowatch.com last October. So, I guess that was it. Still fairly new, KDE, 64-bit, multimedia ready. But I had to only be in it for a short time. Mainly to burn Mandriva Free 2010.2 and finish out the day's work on tuxmachines and ostatic.

But lazy asterisks me, I've been using it for several days again now and it's behaving quite nicely. I had nearly 50 Konqueror windows open today, watching tvtime fullscreen on second monitor, with Liferea pulling in feeds, kmail kmailing, while writing an article in kwrite and using Firefox to input an article onto a Website I work for (that requires java or javascript), all with no slow down or hiccups.

Damn you Kubuntu! Damn you to heeelllll!

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Re: DYK

I used Kubuntu 10.10 64-bit for a while on my lappy. I was pleasantly surprised, when it ran so well as a KDE based distro with minimal fuss.

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