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Army makes major Linux HPC cluster move

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Linux

A U.S. Army supercomputing center with a legacy that dates to the first large computer, the Electronic Numerical Integrator and Computer (ENIAC) launched in 1946, is moving to Linux-based clusters in a major hardware purchase that will more than double its computing capability.

The Army Research Laboratory Major Shared Resource Center (MSRC)is buying four Linux Networx Inc. Advanced Technology Clusters, including a system with 4,488 processing cores, or 1,122 nodes, with each node made up of two dual-core Intel Xeon chips. A second system has 842 nodes.

In total, this purchase will increase its computing capability from 36 trillion floating-point operations per second (TFLOPS) to more than 80 TFLOPS, Army officials said.

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