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The Document Foundation Unleashes First LibreOffice Release

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Today The Document Foundation enthusiatically announced LibreOffice 3.3, the first release of their community developed OpenOffice.org fork. They cite the growth in the number of volunteer developers as the key to releasing ahead of schedule. Contrary to earlier reports stating no new features, today's press release reveals "a number of new and original features."

The most popular unique features among community members are the ability to import and work with SVG files, something that won't be available in OpenOffice.org until 3.4 according to reports; "an easy way to format title pages and their numbering in Writer; a more-helpful Navigator Tool for Writer; improved ergonomics in Calc for sheet and cell management; and Microsoft Works and Lotus Word Pro document import filters."

rest here

Also: How to install LibreOffice 3.3 on Linux




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