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Has AMD Finally Fixed Tearing With Its Linux Driver?

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Hardware
Software

AMD put out a rare beta Linux driver this Monday and they have now just announced the release of the Catalyst 11.1 driver as their stable monthly update for Linux and Windows users. With this Catalyst driver, there is though one interesting but hidden feature that is sure to please many ATI/AMD Radeon Linux desktop users.

While the Catalyst 11.1 driver only officially mentions Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.0 production support and Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5.6 "early look" support as the changes, but there is more. Hidden away within this driver is finally the code that will hopefully eliminate screen tearing for the proprietary Radeon/FirePro Linux driver. This tear-free vsync support is currently considered a "work in progress" but can be enabled manually. This support is designed to ensure a tear-free experience throughout the entire desktop across the spectrum of 2D, 3D, and video applications.

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