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My Ubuntu Adventure

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Ubuntu

My little sister Lisa gave me an old computer she had, a laptop that is even older than my now-ancient (by computer ages) laptop. It's a Presario 2200, and had Windows XP installed on it. I intended to use it as a mobile computer since my laptop's battery has long since bit the dust, and the Presario has enough battery left to be able to be moved, about 15 minutes worth of juice. I spent several days trying to remove enough of the existing software to make it usable for my tasks, but the thing seemed to get slower and slower as I went.

Over the weekend we visited family for our birthdays, and my evil twin Lisa told me about Dropbox. I'd heard of it, but hadn't really given it much thought. I hardly need a way to sync between my single computer, right? Well, now I have TWO computers, so maybe Dropbox would come in handy after all. Once I got home and got the invitation from my sister, I signed up and started to move every file that I felt was crucial to my computer life into the new Dropbox folder. However, to my annoyance, the older computer didn't want anything to do with Dropbox.

That sealed the deal. I decided to install Ubuntu on the new/old computer just to see what would happen. Lisa had reported that the CD drive on the thing was busted, so I prepped a USB stick to install from, and then attempted to change the BIOS so it would boot from USB. Ha. No such setting. I tried a number of ways to convince the BIOS that I really wanted it to read from the USB drive, but it refused. Argh.

rest here




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